John Barleycorn

Cheapskate that I am, I just splashed out the princely sum of £2.97 on Amazon for an ancient weatherbeaten copy of the Camra Guide to Home Brewing by Graham Wheeler (Paperback, 1998) - postage free!!
It is on its way to me.
I'm as excited as an old man can safely allow himself to get.
I'm certain I won't regret this purchase.

hoptimism - the realisation that each pint carries you forward to an ever more perfect ale...
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Pesho77
One step at a time, dont over do it.

 Pesh
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John Barleycorn

I just took delivery of my second hand copy [1997 edition] of 'Home Brewing' by Graham Wheeler.

It cost, including postage and packing, £2.92 from Amazon. Five pence less than I had originally estimated !!
It is not an antique but is old. I am very pleased with its condition. It isn't ancient and weatherbeaten and could have come straight from the bookshop.

On skimming it appears to be packed with brewing info and also contains a large number of recipes to try.

I will have to begin studying. I'm sure I will learn much.

Thank you for the advice Pesho, I will be sure to go steady.

hoptimism - the realisation that each pint carries you forward to an ever more perfect ale...
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Northern Brewster
There’s also a free copy of John Palmer’s book How to Brew available on line. It’s only the 1st edition (4th edition is available to buy) but it’s packed full of useful information from basics through to the more technical.

http://www.howtobrew.com

I don’t have hobbies. I’m developing a robust post-apocalyptic skill set.
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Womble
John Barleycorn wrote:

Cheapskate that I am, I just splashed out the princely sum of £2.97 on Amazon for an ancient weatherbeaten copy of the Camra Guide to Home Brewing by Graham Wheeler (Paperback, 1998) - postage free!!
It is on its way to me.
I'm as excited as an old man can safely allow himself to get.
I'm certain I won't regret this purchase.



I have several versions of the book because I'm a sucker for a cheap deal.   And I just like books.  I've noticed the main text doesn't change but the recipes do.

I prefer his very first book.


Multi-tasking, easy, drink beer and watch telly.
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John Barleycorn
@ Northern Brewster I've had a look through the online version and he does cover a lot of ground, but I think you need a hard copy to get the best of it. Reading online is a very different experience and for an oldie like me makes it much more difficult to study.

@ Womble Yes. Recipes, give us recipes.

I'm very interested in beer as it used to be...
but I have this nagging suspicion that it was mostly water, sugar and yeast with whatever it took to produce some flavour and colour. A bit like country wine production.
It doesn't mean I didn't enjoy those ales of ancient times, just that viewing them through rose tinted glasses turns interpreting them into nothing more than an art of obscurity and complication.
I'm sure breweries both new and old would be more concerned with economics than nice ingredients and the right refined technique.
As long as there were customers and a profit margin it was ok.
Hence, I am sure, you can make a home brew, with good ingredients and careful method, that surpasses the ales available to the public in the past.
hoptimism - the realisation that each pint carries you forward to an ever more perfect ale...
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Northern Brewster
John Barleycorn wrote:
@ Northern Brewster I've had a look through the online version and he does cover a lot of ground, but I think you need a hard copy to get the best of it. Reading online is a very different experience and for an oldie like me makes it much more difficult to study.

@ Womble Yes. Recipes, give us recipes.

I'm very interested in beer as it used to be...
but I have this nagging suspicion that it was mostly water, sugar and yeast with whatever it took to produce some flavour and colour. A bit like country wine production.
It doesn't mean I didn't enjoy those ales of ancient times, just that viewing them through rose tinted glasses turns interpreting them into nothing more than an art of obscurity and complication.
I'm sure breweries both new and old would be more concerned with economics than nice ingredients and the right refined technique.
As long as there were customers and a profit margin it was ok.
Hence, I am sure, you can make a home brew, with good ingredients and careful method, that surpasses the ales available to the public in the past.


I know what you mean. I ended up buying the fourth edition. My kids have kindles but I like having a real book to read. Having said that, you can’t dismiss the fact that the online version is free!

I also have the Graham wheeler, brewing your own British ales book which is packed full of recipes. My favorites being the Timothy Taylor Landlord and the Wadworth JCB. Both of which form the basis of my house bitters.
I don’t have hobbies. I’m developing a robust post-apocalyptic skill set.
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Womble
Recipes => probably not worth posting them as they are quite generic ... suits me fine.

If you want recipes, try this one ... an absolute bargain at just £0.51.  It's just a recipe book. 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Real-Ales-Home-Brewer-Ollosson/dp/1854861514/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1532494854&sr=1-1-fkmr0&keywords=mark+ollosson+brewing

Multi-tasking, easy, drink beer and watch telly.
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Tigermoth
I use recipes often out of Dave Line's book "Brewing Beers Like Those You Buy". The book is full of recipes and methods, mash temperatures etc. etc..
[wave]
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Womble
Tigermoth wrote:
I use recipes often out of Dave Line's book "Brewing Beers Like Those You Buy". The book is full of recipes and methods, mash temperatures etc. etc..


Me too ... it's what got me going.  Bought the book in a charity shop somewhere around 1988 ... it was my holy grail at the time.

His books have come in for quite a lot of flac more recently but I find his recipes work, particularly those in the The Big Book of Brewing. 
Multi-tasking, easy, drink beer and watch telly.
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Tigermoth
Yes I first got his book a long time ago "The Big Book Of Brewing" which has just about fallen apart now but I still refer to it from time to time. Like you it was his book that inspired me to do all grain brewing because most other books at the time where just malt extract brewing but that's how it was then. It wasn't until I had a visit on holiday in the Cotswold's a few years ago that I went into a home brew shop, and very friendly people they were too, that I came across his book "Brewing Beers Like Those You Buy" and I have had some really good brews out of that book. 
I didn't know that his books came in for a lot of flac, I can't understand why because anyone starting out on all grain brewing like myself at the time his book was a Godsend and it has lead me onto other books but still the basis of brewing is just the same but now tweaking it a bit more.
[wave]
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Womble
Tigermoth wrote:
Yes I first got his book a long time ago "The Big Book Of Brewing" which has just about fallen apart now but I still refer to it from time to time. Like you it was his book that inspired me to do all grain brewing because most other books at the time where just malt extract brewing but that's how it was then. It wasn't until I had a visit on holiday in the Cotswold's a few years ago that I went into a home brew shop, and very friendly people they were too, that I came across his book "Brewing Beers Like Those You Buy" and I have had some really good brews out of that book. 
I didn't know that his books came in for a lot of flac, I can't understand why because anyone starting out on all grain brewing like myself at the time his book was a Godsend and it has lead me onto other books but still the basis of brewing is just the same but now tweaking it a bit more.


check out some of the reviews on Amazon ... the UK version and US version ... a lot of them are pretty negative and I have also seen negative posts on brewing forums too. I still find the BoB has a lot to offer despite some of its idiosyncracies.  I don't use Brewing Beers Like Those you Buy anymore as I don't have a clear memory of what a lot of them were like.  I'm not sure I even drank Colt 45 for instance, Ind Coope either and, well, as for Toby Jug ...

When I was a kid, I used to like Courage Best, on draught, not keg.  It was about the most hoppy beer I could find at the time.  I tried it again a few years back ... not very good.  So, I am wondering, is it me that has changed or the beer ... or both ? And taking that into consideration, is it really worth brewing 1970's style beers ?  So, I read Brewing Beers Like Those You Buy for its "historical" interest.

I have both CJJ Berry's books ... I absolutely adore them.  They give a wonderful bird's eye view on what life was like in post-war Britain ... This was the time before plastic pressure barrels even !

Multi-tasking, easy, drink beer and watch telly.
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