PeterPi
After the debacle of my last attempt. On Saturday I made a 10 litre batch of a recipe I found on here using Chinook and Citra. I did modify the hops slightly using 5 gm Hallertau Blanc at 10 minutes and 5 gm Styrian Wolf at 5 minutes. The OG was 1045, it's been dropping every day, is now just under 1025 and it tastes like beer. No sign of action in the fermentation lock, but the falling SG and krausen on top suggests, to a newbie like me, things are happening.
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Clibit
PeterPi wrote:
After the debacle of my last attempt. On Saturday I made a 20 litre batch of a recipe I found on here using Chinook and Citra. I did modify the hops slightly using 5 gm Hallertau Blanc at 10 minutes and 5 gm Styrian Wolf at 5 minutes. The OG was 1045, it's been dropping every day, is now just under 1025 and it tastes like beer. No sign of action in the fermentation lock, but the falling SG and krausen on top suggests, to a newbie like me, things are happening.


It's a numbers game!  And the froth is a good sign. 
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Pesho77

 Just keep checking the gravity, then you can be sure some thing is happening.

 Pesh 
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PeterPi
I just read my post again, and realised I'd exaggerated by 100%. It is a ten litre batch I made. I'll update that now. But it seems all the right things are happening.
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GHW
Leave it alone for a few days (week) then check gravity. The more you open it the more oxygen it’ll be exposed to, which is not a disaster but not ideal either.
But sounds like a brew is going to plan which is a winner
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Northern Brewster
I don’t bother checking gravity too much anymore. I leave it 2-3 weeks and then package. If there’s sugar and yeast it will generally ferment. Check it after a couple of weeks and if it’s somewhere around the expected final gravity then you can package it or check it again the day after to see if it’s finished. Opening it up every day just exposes it to contamination. I know it’s difficult with your first few brews but try and resist opening the lid.

Having said that I opened up my first pils yesterday to make sure it was fermenting so I know the temptation 😁
I don’t have hobbies. I’m developing a robust post-apocalyptic skill set.
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PeterPi
I'm not opening the FV, just drawing a little off from the tap at the bottom. I invested in a refractometer type SG measuring dooberry so I don't think much air is going in. I've not opened the top since sunday, when I checked the krusen, and there was plenty of CO2 in there by then. But thanks for the advice anyhow.

I'm a newbie so I'm up for any excuse to check out the progress. I suppose in a few more brew's I'll become more blasé. Hell I didn't know what krusen was a couple of months ago, and I'm still not sure what a sparge or a flocculant is. [smile] I feel sometimes like the apprentice who is sent to get a skirting ladder or a bucket of steam.

I'm using a 30 Litre mash boiler at the moment and it would be a let better to use something smaller whilst I'm still at the experimenting stage. If I want to do 10 Litre brews, what size pot should I buy? I see a 15 litre one on Amazon, with an induction hob compatible base for £25.00. Any other suggestions welcomed.
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Pinto
TBH, if you're planning on 10L batches, 19L is a more appropriate size - you need to remember that with BIAB, you mash with full water volume (strike + sparge) AND need to account for the volume taken in the pan by the grain itself - 3kgs of grain probably fills 4-5L of pot space, and with absorption, you'll be adding 13 odd litres of water, giving you a pan volume of ~18L during the mash......

Of course, you could do what I do - I make 15L batches in a 15L boiler, but mash over gravity (grain bill for 15L of brew, in a 10L brew's worth of water) and add 5L of cooled boiled water into the FV before the wort transfer to dilute- thus you'd get away with a 15L pan.

Works very well indeed [wink]

If you insist on brewing full volume tho, 8L is about the max you'll fit in a 15L pot.
Beer is like porn - you can buy it easily enough, but its so much more fun to make it [wink]
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Chug
I like to do 12L brews so I have a few different beers on hand to choose from, with care I just about get away with brimming a 15L pot.

Think of Sparging as rinsing the residual sugar from the grain after mash
Think of flocculation as clumping, the yeast clumps together, or floculates
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PeterPi
Pinto wrote:
TBH, if you're planning on 10L batches, 19L is a more appropriate size - you need to remember that with BIAB, you mash with full water volume (strike + sparge) AND need to account for the volume taken in the pan by the grain itself - 3kgs of grain probably fills 4-5L of pot space, and with absorption, you'll be adding 13 odd litres of water, giving you a pan volume of ~18L during the mash......

Of course, you could do what I do - I make 15L batches in a 15L boiler, but mash over gravity (grain bill for 15L of brew, in a 10L brew's worth of water) and add 5L of cooled boiled water into the FV before the wort transfer to dilute- thus you'd get away with a 15L pan.

Works very well indeed [wink]

If you insist on brewing full volume tho, 8L is about the max you'll fit in a 15L pot.


Lots to consider there. If I do mash over gravity, do I need to mash for longer to make sure I get the most out of the grain?

Any 20 Litre pots of decent quality are more than twice the price of the 15 Litre ones, so I'm not going to do anything at the moment.

Thanks.
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PeterPi
Chug wrote:
I like to do 12L brews so I have a few different beers on hand to choose from, with care I just about get away with brimming a 15L pot.

Think of Sparging as rinsing the residual sugar from the grain after mash
Think of flocculation as clumping, the yeast clumps together, or floculates


My comments about Sparging and Flocculation were a bit tongue in cheek, as I've spent a lot of time Googling such terms a lot over the last couple of months.

But, your use of a 15L pot to do 12L brews is very enlightening. I assume that is not BIAB brewing, or am I wrong?

General question. On my first brew I chucked the hops into the pot at the specified times. With the last one I used a bag with plenty of space in it. I have also seen stainless steel strainers used. Is there any preferred method, and how much residue is there by just chucking them in, as I did on my first brew? Looking into the wort after the boil and when to had finished fermenting I didn't have a clue what was what at the bottom of the FV.

Thanks.
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Pinto
PeterPi wrote:


Lots to consider there. If I do mash over gravity, do I need to mash for longer to make sure I get the most out of the grain?

Any 20 Litre pots of decent quality are more than twice the price of the 15 Litre ones, so I'm not going to do anything at the moment.

Thanks.


I don't - my mashes are 45-60 mins and I get 85%+ efficiency when overgrav'ing.  As long as you aren't brewing monster beers in the 1.100 area then the water won't get saturated with sugar, and modern grains easily have enough diastatic power to convert it.
Beer is like porn - you can buy it easily enough, but its so much more fun to make it [wink]
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Chug
PeterPi wrote:



 I assume that is not BIAB brewing, or am I wrong?

General question. On my first brew I chucked the hops into the pot at the specified times. With the last one I used a bag with plenty of space in it. I have also seen stainless steel strainers used. Is there any preferred method, and how much residue is there by just chucking them in, as I did on my first brew? Looking into the wort after the boil and when to had finished fermenting I didn't have a clue what was what at the bottom of the FV.

Thanks.


I have a mesh tube that I mash in which is sitting inside a smaller stockpot and I then transfer to the 15L pot.

I just throw the hops in then strain them out with voile as I pour into FV, that's another bonus of a 12L brew its easy to lift!
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