EspeciallyBitter
Anyone used Strisselspalt in dark beers with heavily kilned malts?

I've used Strisselspalt a few times in Euro pale ales, which is the type of beer I assumed was appropriate given it's a sort of French-German Hersbrucker. For me, it gives quite a citrusy, herbal character, almost grassy at times but with a bit of the noble hop aroma you'd expect given its parentage.

However, browsing through some recipes that use it, I was surprised to find Strisselspalt used in porters and stouts from the late 1800s and early 1900s. For example, a recipe for a 1918 stout from Courage clearly uses them as the bittering addition, whilst an 1870 recipe for running porter from Ron Pattinson's Home Brewer's Guide to Vintage Beer (p.45) lists Strisselspalt as the only hop addition.

I'm guessing it's use back in the day was mainly because Alsace hops were probably considered inferior and therefore good for beers where hop aroma wasn't important. But it got me thinking of trying it as I have a fair amount of this variety in the freezer. But I wondered if Strisselspalt would lend something a bit different than the usual Fuggle, Northern Brewer, et al. that's recommended for English porters. Maybe bitter with something high in alpha acids but unobtrusive and then use Strisselspalt in the last 20 or 30 minutes?
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Womble
Seems a bit of a shame to use Strisselspalt in a dark beer, unless you are wanting to use up a bit of stock that's hanging around.  I doubt you would notice any difference in the final beer, particularly as a late addition. 

I tend to use up my old stock or lower quality hops in dark beers, I don't do late additions any more.  I did try late additions a couple of times but found the hops just got swamped by the roast malts. 
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EspeciallyBitter
That's what I thought. Just surprised to see Strisselspalt being used that way in these old recipes. I get that they were probably considered inferior hops (as in, they weren't Goldings or Fuggle) so English brewers wouldn't use them for aroma, but I imagine imported hops still came at a cost. You'd think there would have been cheaper, older hops to chuck in a porter wort for 90 minutes.
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Womble
Back in the evil 19th century they used to recycle used hops, it went hand in hand with the parti-gyle brewing system. Maybe this nostalgic movement for historical brewing isn't all it's cracked up to be ? Maybe ? Perhaps ?
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