darren west
does anyone have a ag recipe for this please ? 
i tried it at a new brewery this week as i was assisting them with their set up 
it was very nice even with a low abv
thanks
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Clibit
darren west wrote:
does anyone have a ag recipe for this please ? 
i tried it at a new brewery this week as i was assisting them with their set up 
it was very nice even with a low abv
thanks


I've never made a 60 shilling sorry, though there are plenty of recipes out there on the internet. There are people on here who will help, including some very Scottish people. Where is the brewery that makes the beer you like?
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darren west
its only just about to come online , they are in linton near cambridge , 
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Clibit
darren west wrote:
its only just about to come online , they are in linton near cambridge , 


I'm sure they'll give you some clues if you ask, as you've been helping them out? Might give you the recipe.
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darren west
im a electrician .so ive wired up the brewery for them 
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Clibit
darren west wrote:
im a electrician .so ive wired up the brewery for them 


I could do with an electrician!  Just tell them you are getting back into home brewing and loved that beer, any chance of some recipe tips? It often works. The yeast will be crucial. Some breweries will give you a bit. If not, ask them to suggest one you could buy. 
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darren west
what do you need ?
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Clibit
darren west wrote:
what do you need ?


I need to convert an urn into a boiler for one thing. But don't worry, I'll get it sorted.

I can give you Scottish 60 shilling recipes but if you really like a beer and you know the brewer it's logical to ask them for advice, and maybe some yeast.
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Pinto
As Clib says, most brewers are happy to share a little information - perhaps ask the head brewer just what malts and hops they use - from this you can take one of the many 60/- recipes floating round the web and plug in the info you've got.  Make a beer, assess it critically; who knows, you may stumble on the exact combination first time, or you may have to sit down and think about how you got it so far off 😉 thats the fun of brewing.
Beer is like porn - you can buy it easily enough, but its so much more fun to make it [wink]
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Pinto

Just thought I'd run over a point or too, it may be of use to you 😉

If you're trying to design a beer, your first point of call is to select a commercial example you like, as you've done already - it allows you to pick the things that you like about the beer - maltiness, colouring, flavours,hopping, etc.  If you can, a polite e-mail or chat with the brewer could yield a lot of information to help.

Next up, I like to look at the BJCP style guidelines for the brew in question; lets take your Scottish Light : we can gain a lot of info and make assumptions here too (in red)

" The BJCP style guide says: Cleanly malty with a drying finish (this tells us that the beer isnt hop driven, and will have a low FG), perhaps a few esters (esteric yeast - english ale or traditional scottish strain), and on occasion a faint bit of peaty earthiness (smoke) (clue to possible peated malt?). Most beers finish fairly dry considering their relatively sweet palate (dry AND malty ? suggests we might want a brewers invert or basic sugar (muscavado or demerara) here, and to mash at a high temperature to maintain malt complexity), and as such have a different balance than strong Scotch ales. Low to medium malty sweetness (another hint at brewers invert), sometimes accentuated by low to moderate kettle caramelization (caramels come from inclusion of crystal malts or by boiling the hell out of some wort to get kettle caramelisation - hint to content and technique). Some examples have a low hop aroma (mainly boil bops, no or small late aroma addition), light fruitiness (esteric yeast), low diacetyl (another hint on the yeast and brewing technique - low diacetyl producer, likely at a slightly higher ferment temp, 20 deg over 18, say), and/or a low to moderate peaty aroma (small quantity of peated malt if you want this charecter) (all are optional). The peaty aroma is sometimes perceived as earthy, smoky or very lightly roasted."


Ok, So what do we have ?

* Ester producing yeast strain - Scottish strains if you have them, but a good estery english should work well too (such as recovered Fullers, or a Dried London Ale strain)
* Malty but dry - likely use of Invert or basic sugars, along with a high mash temp
* Caramel - Crystal malts or kettle caramelisation - how caramel do YOU like it tho?
* Low Hop aroma - restrained, traditional english hops with boil rather than flame out additions - not gonna want 100g of Citra in the whirlpool 😉
* Peated character, but not strongly so - peated malt is HELLA powerful, so perhaps as little as 1% of the grain bill
* Warmer end of the ferment scale to prevent too much Diacetyl.  Nice ferment period too - 2-3 weeks perhaps.

From here, you can have a go at your own recipe, or plug a premade recipe with any info you can find 😉

 

Making beer is fun fun fun 😃 lol

Beer is like porn - you can buy it easily enough, but its so much more fun to make it [wink]
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