AdrianDBW
Does anyone have a good hop substitutions list?

I've been using this American one, but only because it came up in google;
https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/how-to-brew/hop-substitutions/

I'm particularly interested where different country hops are similar but under different names.

I was just after something that can assist in using my current stock of hops where possible, to avoid buying too many one offs and keep the costs down!
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GHW
I've seen others but they were no more comprehensive than that.
I find that if I want a hop for a reason I struggle to think of substitutes; e.g. Galaxy, nelson Saigon, riwaka, Amarillo. I'm choosing them for what they uniquely bring and would brew with different aims if hey weren't available, rather than try and substitute. I guess if you're looking for general classes of flavour e.g. 'Citrus, dank, earthy, floral' then subbing makes more sense, but you'll still have a different beer at the end of the day when choosing, say, between two 'piney' hops.

Just my observations and rambling s really. I don't mean to criticise the idea or practice of subbing
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Clibit
GHW wrote:
I've seen others but they were no more comprehensive than that. I find that if I want a hop for a reason I struggle to think of substitutes; e.g. Galaxy, nelson Saigon, riwaka, Amarillo. I'm choosing them for what they uniquely bring and would brew with different aims if hey weren't available, rather than try and substitute. I guess if you're looking for general classes of flavour e.g. 'Citrus, dank, earthy, floral' then subbing makes more sense, but you'll still have a different beer at the end of the day when choosing, say, between two 'piney' hops. Just my observations and rambling s really. I don't mean to criticise the idea or practice of subbing


I think hop substitutions are a bit of a myth. Some hops are similarish but all hops are different.
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GHW
Clibit wrote:


I think hop substitutions are a bit of a myth. Some hops are similarish but all hops are different.


Exactamundo
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AdrianDBW
Yeah I agree... However...

I'm considering brewing an altbier for example. I've got half a kilo of fuggles in the freezer, if I can use 30 grams of that in place of spending 5quid on 50g of tettnang, just while I'm trying out the style, and especially as my main interest in it is the partial mash/steeping grains, it just seems more sensible to me!
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Clibit
AdrianDBW wrote:
Yeah I agree... However... I'm considering brewing an altbier for example. I've got half a kilo of fuggles in the freezer, if I can use 30 grams of that in place of spending 5quid on 50g of tettnang, just while I'm trying out the style, and especially as my main interest in it is the partial mash/steeping grains, it just seems more sensible to me!


It's a perfectly acceptable thing to do. It won't be a true altbier, it might not even be an altbier at all, but Fuggles isn't so far away that it will distort the beer out of all recognition, as something like Simcoe would, for example.
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GHW
Bittering may the exception that proves the rule. I can't really tell the difference between any hops used for bitterness!
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Hops_and_Dreams
GHW wrote:
Bittering may the exception that proves the rule. I can't really tell the difference between any hops used for bitterness!

I thought that, but I've got a Graham Wheeler recipe book, where he states more than one variety for bittering. I especially fancy making a Fullers ESB, which has 3 different ones at the start of the boil. So I guess they do add a bit of flavour too?
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Clibit
Hops_and_Dreams wrote:
I thought that, but I've got a Graham Wheeler recipe book, where he states more than one variety for bittering. I especially fancy making a Fullers ESB, which has 3 different ones at the start of the boil. So I guess they do add a bit of flavour too?


I think GW recipes just copy what the breweries do - and they probably use the hops they contract to buy as efficiently as possible. Rather than bittering with three different hops for flavour purposes. I could be wrong. 

That said, I believe very much that different hops produce a different beer when used for bittering. I think a beer bittered with Chinook or Columbus. will be noticeably different from a beer bittered with with Challenger or Northdown. Why do people use Magnum? Why the talk of low cohumulone hops for smooth bittering?
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Hops_and_Dreams
Clibit wrote:
That said, I believe very much that different hops produce a different beer when used for bittering.

That is probably the reason for multiple hops then. I'd never given the bittering hop much thought before, just a high AA% workhorse with one purpose.
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Steve
Clibit wrote:


I think GW recipes just copy what the breweries do - and they probably use the hops they contract to buy as efficiently as possible. Rather than bittering with three different hops for flavour purposes. I could be wrong. 

That said, I believe very much that different hops produce a different beer when used for bittering. I think a beer bittered with Chinook or Columbus. will be noticeably different from a beer bittered with with Challenger or Northdown. Why do people use Magnum? Why the talk of low cohumulone hops for smooth bittering?


I use a lot of Magnum for bittering, it's cheap,clean and has high AAs
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Pinto
I personally dont think you can swap a hop - just find something else in the style; WGV and Fuggles for instance - not the same, but for a classic english bitter, each as good as the other for their own particular reasons.
Beer is like porn - you can buy it easily enough, but its so much more fun to make it [wink]
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GHW
This thread is the epitome of 'furiously agreeing with each other', only less furious.
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Notlaw
I agree that there are differences in bittering hops.  I have always thought the beers I bittered with Northern Brewer were better than the ones I've bittered with Magnum.  Even though I've probably used Magnum more, just because I had half a kilo of it.
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Clibit
Notlaw wrote:
I agree that there are differences in bittering hops.  I have always thought the beers I bittered with Northern Brewer were better than the ones I've bittered with Magnum.  Even though I've probably used Magnum more, just because I had half a kilo of it.


I've been using some of that half kilo. [wink]

Still got a bit left.b
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