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Clibit
denny wrote:


AAMOF, the preferred yeast for them is WY1318, which is called "London III"


1318 and Vermont yeasts seem to dominate the recipes for NEIPA. London III is often referred to as Boddingtons yeast but the evidence suggests otherwise. It probably is from a London brewery think. Youngs is the brewery it is most linked to.

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Simonh82
Clibit wrote:


1318 and Vermont yeasts seem to dominate the recipes for NEIPA. London III is often referred to as Boddingtons yeast but the evidence suggests otherwise. It probably is from a London brewery think. Youngs is the brewery it is most linked to.



I think the Young's strain is meant to be Wyeast 1968 London special ale. At least according to the info on the Mr Malty site. Saying that, that's the same site which says London III is the Boddingtons strain.

I've successfully cultured the Young's yeast from bottles and I'd be surprised if it was related to anything that was popular in NEIPAs. It produced a beer which was incredibly malt forward despite having plenty of hops.
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Clibit
Simonh82 wrote:
I think the Young's strain is meant to be Wyeast 1968 London special ale. At least according to the info on the Mr Malty site. Saying that, that's the same site which says London III is the Boddingtons strain. I've successfully cultured the Young's yeast from bottles and I'd be surprised if it was related to anything that was popular in NEIPAs. It produced a beer which was incredibly malt forward despite having plenty of hops.


Tbh honest I wouldn't expect Young's yeast cultured from bottles to be very similar to the Wyeast version cultured a while ago, if it was taken from Young's beer. But we will never really know. Wyeast just days 1318 originates from a traditional London brewery. 
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denny
Simonh82 wrote:
I think the Young's strain is meant to be Wyeast 1968 London special ale. At least according to the info on the Mr Malty site. Saying that, that's the same site which says London III is the Boddingtons strain. I've successfully cultured the Young's yeast from bottles and I'd be surprised if it was related to anything that was popular in NEIPAs. It produced a beer which was incredibly malt forward despite having plenty of hops.


Pretty certain 1968 is Fuller's.  And that's what the site says too.
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Robert

Fullers yeast or Gales yeast?

https://www.fullers.co.uk/blog/beer-articles/yeast

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We have two strains of yeast on site – the Fuller’s yeast and the Gales yeast. Both are stored in the same way, in a Yeast Storage Vessel at 4°C, but at opposite ends of the brewery to avoid any potential cross contamination.

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Each yeast brings a different flavour profile to their beers. Fuller’s yeast gives  orange citrus, and toffee flavours to the beer (marmalade notes at discernible at higher A.B.V.), whereas Gales yeast tends to bring a soft fruit flavour to the fermentations, with red berry fruits coming through. The yeast goes in at the end of the brewing day, when you’ve cooled the wort down after boiling in the whirlpool. It is at this point you also add oxygen.

Every ten to twelve generations, a fresh culture of yeast is grown to keep the quality consistent with every brew batch, similar to the way sourdough bread is made.

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Robert

Since we all seem to be agreeing with one another I'm not sure this adds anything to the debate but I think this bloke is right.

http://www.port66.co.uk/yeast-brewing-myths-ideal-house-strain/

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There are great examples of excellent beers from traditional breweries all over the UK, Hook Norton, Fullers and Shepherd Neame but what is it about these beers that makes them so interesting and amazing?  I’d thought for a while that it was malt character and quality and especially malt complexity that help create such an interesting beer at a modest abv. This was certainly a tack I tried to take when I was brewing commercially but when you look at these beers and their recipes you’ll find them to be simple and very much the same, Maris otter, crystal, flaked maize (sometimes), fuggles and goldings hops. This really doesn’t leave much else apart from yeast and that in fact I think is the key, traditional British beers, even though they are fairly ubiquitous are exceptional because the main character building ingredient is the yeast.

Clean tasting yeasts don't cut it for low alcohol beer.

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Clibit
Robert wrote:

Since we all seem to be agreeing with one another I'm not sure this adds anything to the debate but I think this bloke is right.

http://www.port66.co.uk/yeast-brewing-myths-ideal-house-strain/

Clean tasting yeasts don't cut it for low alcohol beer.



He is right, and incidentally he is James Kemp, the brewer at the Marble brewery in Manchester.

But british yeasts vary a fair bit, and some are considerably cleaner than others.

1768 is the yeast thought to be from Youngs.
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Simonh82
Clibit wrote:


He is right, and incidentally he is James Kemp, the brewer at the Marble brewery in Manchester.

But british yeasts vary a fair bit, and some are considerably cleaner than others.

1768 is the yeast thought to be from Youngs.


I knew it ended in 68. I was getting muddled.
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Clibit
Simonh82 wrote:


I knew it ended in 68. I was getting muddled.


It's easy to mix up the numbers!

There are a lot of session beers being made with us05 now in this country. They tend to use American hops too, though. But I don't think myself that English hops are out of the question, you can still get plenty of flavour from English malts and hops in a 4% ale. Nottingham yeast is pretty neutral and is widely used. Some yeast character is generally desirable though, I guess.

It appears to be the case that more American brewers are adopting yeasts with some character, to add another layer to their hoppy beers, I guess, and enhance the fruitiness. But I'm only surmising from internet browsing.
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