Clibit
An article with some up to date info. 

https://www.bfbi.org.uk/members-news/british-hop-harvest-2018/

"From aroma hop crosses made in 2011, 2012 & 2013 there are over 60 new British Hop varieties coming through the programme that have been assessed during the last 5 years – there is no doubt that at least 3 will be market leading aroma hops of the future.

"2018 marks the year that the British hop breeding programme will introduce molecular science to speed up the hop breeding cycle.  The British Association together with Reading University and the East Malling Research Centre have recruited a PhD student, Rob Brown, who will devote the next three years to the introduction of genetics SNP markers into the British hop breeding programme. Rob is currently completing a Masters at Kew Gardens and will start on 1st October.

"British craft brewers often rave about new world American and New Zealand hops. In return American and New Zealand craft brewers are raving about British Hops. These overseas brewers are now seeking delicate, complex hop aromas to create drinkable session beers. And it is the unique terroir of British Hops with lower levels of myrcene that makes British Hops the perfect hop to brew a drinkable session beer.

"Even in 2018, with the extremely warm weather and dry condittions, British Hops have thrived. It is anticpated that 2018 will be an average crop rather than a bumper crop but what is definite is that the aromas will be fantastic thanks to all the hot sunny weather.

For British craft brewers seeking the high notes in British Hops the key varieties are:
•    Jester® hops – intense grapefruit and tropical fruit notes
•    Olicana® – mango, grapfruit and passionfruit flavours
•    Admiral hops – cooked marmalade, orangey citrus
•    Bramling Cross hops – blackcurrant, spicy, lemon
•    UK Cascade hops – lychees, floral, grapefruit
•    Endeavour hops (a British daughter of Cascade) – citrus, summer fruits
•    Target hops – sage, spice, citrus

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Robert
https://www.britishhops.org.uk/varieties/
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Robert
Archer hops are worth a mention, I used some in the light ale I sent Steve, nice restrained fruitiness.
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Clibit
Robert wrote:
Archer hops are worth a mention, I used some in the light ale I sent Steve, nice restrained fruitiness.


I've got some of them. I used half the packet in a fruit beer that went horribly wrong. I'll try to get round to using what's left. Described as a bit peachy, IIRC.
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Clibit
Some figures for the English hop industry, acres and tonnes.

• Area –
2017 2390 acres 
2016 2270 
2015 2210 
2007 2625

• Production –
2017 1780 tonnes   (World production 118,400 tonnes: USA 47,300  Germany 39,200)
2016 1424 
2015 1357 
2007 1473

So 2016/2017 saw an increase in acreage and 2017 quite a significant increase in production. Largely due to demand from USA, according to other stuff I've read.  I believe they take about half the UK crop now.

USA 40% of 2017 World crop, Germany 33%, UK 1.5%

Variety Area (ac) % UK area
Goldings 348     14.6 %
EKG 242          10.1 %
First Gold 237    9.9 %
Fuggles 232       9.7 %
Progress 190     8.0 %
Pilgrim 175       7.3 %

So the above hops account for about 60% of UK hop acreage, Goldings about 25%. Another 26 hop varieties make up the other 40%. So small amounts, many are newish varieties still seeking to establish themselves in the market. Target has slipped down, it used to be one of the biggest crops, for its alpha, I believe. I'd expect Admiral to have decent acreage, maybe Pilgrim is now preferred by growers, yield or disease resistance perhaps. I thought Challenger was a big crop too.

• Locations (as at harvest 2017) – South East 53.2 %  West Midlands 46.8 %

https://www.canr.msu.edu/great_lakes_hop_and_barley_conference/uploads/GLHBC%202018%20Production.pdf
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Clibit
History of UK hops - interesting...

Some extracts...

http://thehopproject.co.uk/map/hop-growing/

The 19th century was the golden age of the hop industry. Hop acreage continued to increase until 1878 when it reached a peak of 77,000 acres. However, tastes changed, and there was a decline in the demand for porter and lighter beer, known as Indian Ale or Pale Ale, became fashionable. Pasteurisation arrived in the late 1870s and fewer hops were needed as a preservative. Clean water became more available and this may have contributed to a falling demand for beer. By 1909, there were only 32,000 acres of land being used to grow hops and a renewed import of foreign hops. This was due to breweries being contracted to brew foreign beers under licence, and thus being required to use the hops stipulated in the original recipe.

Twenty three years later and acreage had fallen to 16,500. The producer-controlled Hops Marketing Board was created to control the flailing industry. The Board would negotiate a guaranteed price with the growers and the brewers would indicate their expected demand to the Board, resulting in allocated quotas to each grower. This brought stability and by 1968 acreage had slowly increased to 17,900 acres. However, in 1982 EEC rules led to the disbanding of the Board and the introduction of independent producer groups for the marketing of English hops.

The hop industry was soon to face further problems as lager gained in popularity and fewer hops were required. In addition, the seeded hops produced in the UK were purported by competing countries to be of inferior quality. This has since been disproved, but the myth caused considerable damage to the British hop industry.

Formerly, hops were grown in almost every region of the UK, but they are now confined largely to the West Midlands and south eastern counties of England. Because a huge itinerant force of workers was needed to pick the crop by hand, production became concentrated near to the industrial areas of London, South Wales and the West Midlands where working class families were glad to be able to spend their annual holidays in the countryside.

Today, with almost no Government support, the development of new varieties continues apace. When the Wye College hop development programme was closed down, the British Hop Association (formerly National Hop Association) created a subsidiary company in 2007 called Wye Hops to continue driving the British Hop industry forward.

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Clibit
Bad news! Let's hope it gets sorted...

UK pub closures: Traditional British pint and hop-growing at risk, with surplus of 800 tons of hops — enough to brew 700m pints

Unless the Government buys up the surplus, valued at £8m, many of the 59 family owned farms responsible will be forced to quit the business.

The traditional British pint is under threat as pub closures have put the centuries-old hop-growing industry in jeopardy.

Figures, shared with i, reveal that half of the hops grown in Britain this year won’t be used – leaving a surplus of 800 tons, or enough to brew 700 million pints of cask ale.

Unless the Government buys up the surplus, valued at £8m, many of the 59 family owned farms responsible for the country’s entire hop crop will be forced to quit the business – and once they have exited they will not come back, the British Hop Association warns.

https://inews.co.uk/news/consumer/uk-pub-closures-traditional-british-pint-hop-growing-risk-471309/amp

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GHW
well there's been a swelling in numbers of home brewers, sell them to us
come on guys if we all brew a few extra batches we can save the industry!
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Alcoholx
i am down for saving the world a pint at a time!
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Pesho77

 I was thinkin that, or send em to America, they'll use them all in 1 batch.

 Pesh
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[amw]
Pesho77 wrote:

 I was thinkin that, or send em to America, they'll use them all in 1 batch.

 Pesh


It would be nice to think we could sell them all to America, however I suspect they are about to have very much the same kind of problem, only on a bigger scale and different varieties of hops.
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EspeciallyBitter
Pesho77 wrote:

 I was thinkin that, or send em to America, they'll use them all in 1 batch.

 Pesh

Would be good for me if homebrew suppliers in the US suddenly started stocking a surplus of English hops.

In all honesty, £8 million to save an entire business sector seems like small change. Maybe that 'Spoons fella can reach into his pocket?...
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[amw]

Would be good for me if homebrew suppliers in the US suddenly started stocking a surplus of English hops.

In all honesty, £8 million to save an entire business sector seems like small change. Maybe that 'Spoons fella can reach into his pocket?...


I fear that 'spoons bloke would probably quite like to do away with real ale (it can't be his most profitable product) and the untimely demise of English hops would probably help with that.

I may be biassed as I've had a few ropey pints in 'spoons 😉
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