Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Clibit

Avatar / Picture

Administrator
Registered:
Posts: 13,806
Reply with quote  #1 
Been enjoying reading this blog and this is a really interesting article about stingo, and how it influenced Rodenbach ...

http://www.browneandbitter.com/2014/08/brew-day-stingo.html?m=1
0
John Barleycorn

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 380
Reply with quote  #2 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clibit
Been enjoying reading this blog and this is a really interesting article about stingo, and how it influenced Rodenbach ...

http://www.browneandbitter.com/2014/08/brew-day-stingo.html?m=1


I remember a number of barley wines in the sixties pubs in London. They'd be up on the shelf behind the bar: Stingo, Gold Label, Pony, Export Gold to name a few - in tiny bottles about the same size as a Babycham bottle.
'As Strong as a double Scotch'.
Used to pour a bottle into a pint to up the flavour and alcohol content of the beer. Always drank them as a mixer, had quite a few of those back in the day. They were a very dark brown, thick and malty, treacly almost.

Re-reading that article I don't think the Barley Wine I used to partake of was the same as the product he described. I never drank the stuff on its own, in my view it wasn't palatable until it was added with a beer. I don't remember anyone who sat, or stood, sipping a glass of it, on its own, straight out of the bottle. 

In the sixties I would, where I could choose, drink and enjoy DoubleDiamond, Younger's Tartan, Worthington 'E' or Draught Bass from the pump at about 10p a pint and maybe a Newcastle Brown out of a bottle. I would never add a Barley Wine to them. That priviledge was saved for lesser ales that needed a lift.
So all in all I would say Barley Wine was used to make poor ales a little richer. It is the way I saw it then. I wouldn't run away from a pint of one those bitters right now, or even a lower grade ale with a barley wine chucked in it for that matter, despite the talk of how rubbish it all was.

Modern taste is inclined to drink 'Wines' unmixed and/or maybe straight from the bottle? I'm sure its an admirable way of doing things, but a little strange to me and my old ways.
 


__________________
hoptimism - the realisation that each pint carries you forward to an ever more perfect ale...
0
GHW

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 4,087
Reply with quote  #3 
I always thought barley wine tasted too much like whisky, which I can’t stand
I’d rather drink ordinary beer or proper wine
0
AdrianDBW

Avatar / Picture

Useful Idiot
Registered:
Posts: 1,179
Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GHW
I always thought barley wine tasted too much like whisky, which I can’t stand
I’d rather drink ordinary beer or proper wine


Me too! And I don't generally like whiskey either!
0
Clibit

Avatar / Picture

Administrator
Registered:
Posts: 13,806
Reply with quote  #5 
I like whisky but not barley wine, which tends to be too sweet. Maybe brett ageing was done psrtly to counteract that, via acidity and/or reduced final gravity. 
0
Hops_and_Dreams

Avatar / Picture

Administrator
Registered:
Posts: 2,462
Reply with quote  #6 
Never tried barley wine. I don't intend to based on this!
0
Northern Brewster

Avatar / Picture

Administrator
Registered:
Posts: 1,270
Reply with quote  #7 
The barley wine Ikve made definitely has a sweetness to it but I don’t think it’s anything like whiskey. To me it has a sherry-like quality. It’s very smooth too.
My dad use to have the odd Gold label but would never add it to another beer.

__________________
I don’t have hobbies. I’m developing a robust post-apocalyptic skill set.
0
Pesho77

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 774
Reply with quote  #8 

 Yeah mines more sherry like too.

 Pesh
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.