Clibit
As someone who doesn't have a chiller I have occasionally wondered about getting a chill cube. 

Cube.jpg 

Much loved of Aussie home brewers, presumably as they don't waste all that chiller water. And a lot of them apparently do cube hopping. So, at the end of the boil, hops are added to the cube and then the hot wort is siphoned into the cube and sealed. The heat sterilises the cube, so no steriliser or additional water is required.

I like this idea, and I like the idea of cube hopping. It is like a whirlpool/steep/hop stand, but you save time on brew day - you are finished soon after the end of the boil. I also like the idea of an extended hop stand. You could probably do away with all kettle hopping, though IBUs would be very hard to predict until you got experienced with the technique. Most people  transfer to an FV within a week, I think, and pitch the yeast. Some people pitch the yeast into the cube!  If the cube had a tap that fitted a bottling wand, you could then bottle straight from the cube. Less risk of oxidation and infection, less work. 

Anyone done any of these things?
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Notlaw
I no-chill more than I chill tbh.  I have one of those drinking water plastic jerry cans that people get for caravans and motorhomes... just like the usual cubes, but thicker, sturdier plastic.  I have added hops to them before, both at transfer and also a couple of hours later when it was down to about 70°C-ish.  I fermented in it once too, but haven't again, just because It was a swine to clean afterwards.
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Clibit
Notlaw wrote:
I no-chill more than I chill tbh.  I have one of those drinking water plastic jerry cans that people get for caravans and motorhomes... just like the usual cubes, but thicker, sturdier plastic.  I have added hops to them before, both at transfer and also a couple of hours later when it was down to about 70°C-ish.  I fermented in it once too, but haven't again, just because It was a swine to clean afterwards.


Yeah the cleaning must put most people off. I think I might get me a cube or two. 
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Badseed
I could have done with one last night. My first brew inside my shed and all went well till I got the chiller out and realised the water inside the hosepipe was frozen solid!

In the end I waited till it was at around 75 ish and just dumped it in the FV and into the fridge and pitched yeast this morning.

Hopefully it'll work out Ok!
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Clibit
Badseed wrote:
I could have done with one last night. My first brew inside my shed and all went well till I got the chiller out and realised the water inside the hosepipe was frozen solid! In the end I waited till it was at around 75 ish and just dumped it in the FV and into the fridge and pitched yeast this morning. Hopefully it'll work out Ok!


I'm sure it will. Probably a good move anyway, hot wort will sanitise the FV. 
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Badseed
I might get some of these, I love the idea of having them ready to chuck in the FV and pitch yeast as soon as there's space in the fridge.
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Clibit
This article is based on one brewer's experience of no chill brewing for one year, with some interesting feedback:

http://brulosophy.com/2015/02/09/a-year-of-no-chill-lessons-from-a-secret-xbmt/


And a Brulosophy exbmt comparing two batches of beer, one quick chilled and the other no chill. Interesting results, most tasters could identify the odd one out in a triangle test, but preferences were evenly split between the two beers.

http://brulosophy.com/2015/11/09/cooling-the-wort-pt-1-no-chill-vs-quick-chill-exbeeriment-results/


And a short article about no chill ,but an interesting suggestion, to delay normal hop additions by 20 mins each to compensate for the added IBUs after flame out from the lack of chilling. 60 min additions moved to 40 mins, for example.

https://beerandbrewing.com/no-chill-brewing/



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Clibit
Saw this on Reddit, a guy who did an entire brew (extract) in a cube!  Brew day took 5 minutes:

Ho ho ho..

so, I've been tinkering with a new Q+D brewing method, Brew in a cube. It springs from the following observations: a) Dried Malt Extract does not need to be boiled. b) Hops isomerise at and over 80C, and... c) A 20 litre water jerry can filled with boiling water holds over 80c for well over an hour.

So with all that in mind, I dumped DME, hops and boiling water into a 15 litre HDPE water jerry can ("cube"), sealed it and insulated. Now, the wort has been sealed up for a week or so, as I'm waiting on room in my fermenting fridge, but a sampler from the cube tap revealed a great level of bitterness and definite hop taste and aroma. I'll be kicking off ferment tomorrow I think, so I'll report back on the finished beer in a few weeks, but I wanted to get some thoughts on this process?

Obvious improvements will be to incorporate a steeping grains step, and even better, to run some serious numbers on the temp cooling : time and the resultant IBU. I'd have to get a lab involved for that though! As an all grain brewer, if this works I'm looking at banging out one each time i do a "real" batch. total time was about five minutes not including the time taken to boil 15 litres of water. Cheers.

EDIT: speeling

UPDATE #1 -> Pitched today. 15 litres of 1.052 wort. I intended to use US05 yeast, but the cupboard was bare, so I pitched an expired packet of Sterling Ale 514. Wort taste was excellent! Bitterness as intended with enough aroma / flavour to get me excited. I'll probably dry hop it as well when the yeast have finished up. Will report back with a finished beer update in a week or so.

UPDATE # 2 -> Day 2 of ferment. Crazy storm yesterday knocked out the power, so the brew free ranged for a day... no idea what temp it got up to, but back at 18c now. I was in the shed just now and thought, stuff it, have a taster. The citra flavour is crazy nice, starting to pop out as the sugars drop. Bitterness is high, but smooth. I'll try to leave it alone for a while now. I think this is working well folks!

UPDATE #3 brew conked out at 1.020, likely due to crappy old yeast, but equally could be oxygen or nutrient or something due to the process. Trying to get it down a few points before kegging. Tastes great, but a bit sweet.

As said in last update, the brew stalled out at 1.018. Thats the bad news. Also, 5 days of cold crashing havent done much to clear it up, so it's quite cloudy. But... the hop flavour is freaking incredible. Juicy, tropical citrussy goodness.

Dudes, i have here a session neipa and it's bloody glorious. Qualified success for the method but i will be back for a 2nd try.

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Badseed
Would I be right in thinking that if I quickly chilled my wort to under 80 degrees then cubed it then there would be no problem with late hop additions?

Also, I use a hop spider. Would the fact that I'm not dumping actual hops in the cube make a difference or does it not work that way?

Either way, I'm gonna give this a go on a Belgian or a stout soon.
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Clibit
Badseed wrote:
Would I be right in thinking that if I quickly chilled my wort to under 80 degrees then cubed it then there would be no problem with late hop additions?

Also, I use a hop spider. Would the fact that I'm not dumping actual hops in the cube make a difference or does it not work that way?

Either way, I'm gonna give this a go on a Belgian or a stout soon.


Yes cubing at 80C and adding hops makes sense. Still hot enough to sanitise the cube.

What do you mean by 'not dumping actual hops'?  Will you dump fake hops?  [confused]
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Badseed
Haha, poorly worded but I just meant that I'd be leaving the gunky hop matter behind in the spider 😃


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Clibit
Badseed wrote:
Haha, poorly worded but I just meant that I'd be leaving the gunky hop matter behind in the spider 😃




If the hops don't make it into the cube then using a cube won't affect your brew compared to your current method. 

But I think the use of a cube opens up an interesting hopping opportunity or two. Like a long hop steep starting at any temperature you like. Or a dry hop prior to fermentation, maybe!
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Badseed
Normally I'd leave my late/0 min additions in the spider till cooling is complete then transfer to FV leaving the hops behind in the spider. I'm thinking I might have a go at postponing any 0 min hops till after a quick chill to 80 and then chuck em in the cube with the wort. Pre-fermentation dry hop sounds like an interesting experiment, though I imagine the start of active fermentation would likely drive off any aroma they would add. Worth a try once though I'd imagine 😉

It's so rare that I get a spare 5 hrs or so to brew these days that this might be just what I need. The idea of kegging/bottling a brew and then having one ready to chuck on the yeast cake is very appealing!

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Clibit
Badseed wrote:
Normally I'd leave my late/0 min additions in the spider till cooling is complete then transfer to FV leaving the hops behind in the spider. I'm thinking I might have a go at postponing any 0 min hops till after a quick chill to 80 and then chuck em in the cube with the wort. Pre-fermentation dry hop sounds like an interesting experiment, though I imagine the start of active fermentation would likely drive off any aroma they would add. Worth a try once though I'd imagine 😉

It's so rare that I get a spare 5 hrs or so to brew these days that this might be just what I need. The idea of kegging/bottling a brew and then having one ready to chuck on the yeast cake is very appealing!



I think it's about experimenting for yourself, people come to different conclusions.

There are loads of brewers putting hops into fermentation now in the belief that something called bio-transformation does something magical to the hop oils. Or something. 

I've been semi no chilling all along. Get the temp down to about 40C in the sink in about 30 mins (10 litre batches), then dump into the FV and wait for it to get below 25C before pitching. I might just transfer to FV sooner, like 80C, the wort gets to 80C very quickly in a sink of cold water. Maybe I wouldn't need to use any sanitising agents in the FV. Just make sure it's very clean. 

I've seen posts from some no chillers who have ended up only hopping twice, at the start of the boil for bitterness, and dry hopping in the FV for aroma.  ( presumably they have decided that late boil hops and hot steep hops are not effective ways of getting hop aroma, compared to dry hopping).
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