Clibit
Having read the thread on HBT about the yeast used in Tree House Julius, which appears to be a blend of S04, T-58 and WB-06, I have wondered again about using more than one yeast to benefit from the traits of each. (although nobody appears to have had any success in their attempts to blend those three yeasts!)

So, keep it simpler I guess. Pitch something like US-05 or Nottingham, for reliable attenuation, get the job done. Add something with more esters, for extra flavour. S-33, or Windsor, maybe.

More than one possible method:
1. Pitch at different times 
2. Pitch different quantities
3. Pitch into two FVs - split the batch, then blend before bottling/kegging.

Would you consider blending liquid yeasts? If so, any ideas which and why? Sounds daft perhaps, but most commercial strains are single strains, while many breweries have dual or multi-strain yeasts.

Anybody tried anything like this, or fancy a go? Or is this just going too far, better to just try out yeasts and stick with the ones you like? Make some beer. Drink it? [rofl]




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Fermented Culture
I'm going to be blending some yeast for grodzinskie later on. Apparently windsor and nottingham are good yeasts to co-pitch from what I've read.

Here's an old talk about yeast blending from white labs:

http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/attachments/presentations/pdf/2014/A%20Guide%20To%20Blending%20Yeast%20Strains.pdf

Some yeasts co-flocculate btw.


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Fermented Culture
Speaking of nottingham and other dried yeasts. There's a theory that nottingham is a blend of two yeasts and some other companies make blends already!

edit: Just had a thought, lots of people secondary ferment or co-pitch brett [smile].
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Clibit
Fermented Culture wrote:
I'm going to be blending some yeast for grodzinskie later on. Apparently windsor and nottingham are good yeasts to co-pitch from what I've read.

Here's an old talk about yeast blending from white labs:

http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/attachments/presentations/pdf/2014/A%20Guide%20To%20Blending%20Yeast%20Strains.pdf

Some yeasts co-flocculate btw.


Great link thanks. 

"Why should you experiment with  yeast  blending? 
Add unique  and  more complex flavors  to your  brews  Combine  alcohol  tolerant strains  with less  tolerant  strains  of  a flavor profile  you  enjoy 
To help finish  out  attenuation  of a beer 
To help with conditioning  aspects,  such  as flocculation 

By co flocculate, do you mean one brings the other down with it?
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Fermented Culture
More that they stick together, but yeah generally they will sediment if that happens.
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GHW
Yeast gives me enough headaches without blending! I've learnt the hard way though.
TBH I'm not sure I'd be able to tell the difference, or maybe more accurately whether it made a difference to my beer.
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GHW
Also I'm not sure I want anything 'co-flocculating' in my FV
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