Hops_and_Dreams
Got some of this to use in a bitter. It seems that it has a habit of starting to ferment again in the bottle. Anyone have any experience of this or successfully bottled with no issues?
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Clibit
Hops_and_Dreams wrote:
Got some of this to use in a bitter. It seems that it has a habit of starting to ferment again in the bottle. Anyone have any experience of this or successfully bottled with no issues?


I can't even remember if I have used it, I  have never bought it but think I had some from a friend once. I have used WLP002 though, and I have had over carbonated bottles. From what I know, I think the problem is down to how flocculant the yeast is. WLP002 and 1968 are very keen to drop out. Brewers think it has finished, when it has just dropped out having nearly finished! Many brewers get high attenuation from these yeasts too, much higher than the attenuation suggested by Wyeast and White Labs. 80+%.

Ringwood is another. I have read a comment somewhere quoting a Ringwood brewer, saying it's a pain to work with. In other words, not all yeasts can just be left to do their job, then you package the beer when it stops. Dry yeasts seem to be selected for their ease of use. I may be wrong. Liquid yeasts were stolen from places that made famous beer, to help sell them and provide yeast known to make good beer, I suppose. 

Anyway, keep rousing the yeast until you can't get the gravity to drop any more, would be my advice, if you haven't used it before. 
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Hops_and_Dreams
Thanks Clibit, I'll give that a try.
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Womble
I've bottled an IPA made with 1968 ... no problems and it turned out great. The yeast had been recycled however.
Multi-tasking, easy, drink beer and watch telly.
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