John Barleycorn

here's some interesting data about combining more than one yeast strain in a single brew.
Suitable and sufficiently useful info for a beginner like myself, though quite probably something here for the more advanced brewer too.

https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/attachments/presentations/pdf/2014/A%20Guide%20To%20Blending%20Yeast%20Strains.pdf

I think this presentation is well worth looking over and I hope someone here finds it useful..
here's a bit more:

Quote:
By combining yeast, you can create a yeast profile that is not only secret, but produces a unique signature flavor.

https://www.whitelabs.com/beer/using-multiple-yeast-strains 





hoptimism - the realisation that each pint carries you forward to an ever more perfect ale...
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Pesho77

 Just copy and paste the whole link 

 Pesh
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John Barleycorn
Pesho77 wrote:

 Just copy and paste the whole link 

 Pesh

thanks Pesho, I eventually succeeded, it was the spaces in the link creating the problem.
hoptimism - the realisation that each pint carries you forward to an ever more perfect ale...
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Clibit
Cheers John, I'll check that out later, I'm interested in this. 
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John Barleycorn
Clibit wrote:
Cheers John, I'll check that out later, I'm interested in this. 


It is your suggestion that I try more and different yeasts that started me looking around at this sort of stuff. Apparently yeasts in general can coexist though there are nevertheless killer yeasts that won't tolerate others, so with a little knowledge it is possible to create your own personal combination.

The presentation shows among other things how and when a given yeast produces its specific effects.
For example for good flocculation the yeast has to be present well before the end of the fermentation and the first 72 hours are when aroma and flavour are produced.

It covers a wide range of information about yeasts and I reckon it makes a good introduction to stimulate further research.

I have been upping temperature at the end of fermentation to develop flavour - it turns out that wasn't going to happen, so I have learnt a little and can put the knowledge into practice now.


hoptimism - the realisation that each pint carries you forward to an ever more perfect ale...
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Clibit
John Barleycorn wrote:


It is your suggestion that I try more and different yeasts that started me looking around at this sort of stuff. Apparently yeasts in general can coexist though there are nevertheless killer yeasts that won't tolerate others, so with a little knowledge it is possible to create your own personal combination.

The presentation shows among other things how and when a given yeast produces its specific effects.
For example for good flocculation the yeast has to be present well before the end of the fermentation and the first 72 hours are when aroma and flavour are produced.

It covers a wide range of information about yeasts and I reckon it makes a good introduction to stimulate further research.

I have been upping temperature at the end of fermentation to develop flavour - it turns out that wasn't going to happen, so I have learnt a little and can put the knowledge into practice now.




I've done quite a few fermentations with two yeast strains, but i have plenty to learn. I'm also interested in learning more about mixed fermentations involving Saccharomyces, brett and bacteria. 
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John Barleycorn
Clibit wrote:


I've done quite a few fermentations with two yeast strains, but i have plenty to learn. I'm also interested in learning more about mixed fermentations involving Saccharomyces, brett and bacteria. 


from what i've just been reading aren't they for brews you intend to leave for ageing?
I haven't reached the stage where I can let my brew be, though when I think about it I have got a few bottles of banana wine and elderberry wine, lurking about somewhere and I know they will be nasty if I don't leave em alone for a good while...
hoptimism - the realisation that each pint carries you forward to an ever more perfect ale...
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Clibit
John Barleycorn wrote:


from what i've just been reading aren't they for brews you intend to leave for ageing?



Generally yes. I've done a brew with brett that didn't take long but is developing in the bottle. Was good after a month, I'm sampling a bottle every month or so.
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John Barleycorn
At the stage I'm at I'm more interested in the flavour and aroma a combination of yeasts could give to a beer, but it seems there is a huge range of possibilities with this approach.
It ssems what I have been reading has been more aimed a the small commercial craft brewer who wants to create his or her unique brew. Very interesting though and I do like to experiment.
hoptimism - the realisation that each pint carries you forward to an ever more perfect ale...
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Clibit
John Barleycorn wrote:
At the stage I'm at I'm more interested in the flavour and aroma a combination of yeasts could give to a beer, but it seems there is a huge range of possibilities with this approach.
It ssems what I have been reading has been more aimed a the small commercial craft brewer who wants to create his or her unique brew. Very interesting though and I do like to experiment.


People often pitch Windsor and Nottingham together. Windsor for its flavour, Nottingham for attenuation. Windsor often stops at a pretty high gravity like 1020. Ive done S33 with Nottingham, same reason. Im more interested now in multi strain brewing for flavour complexity. White labs is doing mixed strains too, saison blends etc. Saison plus brett. I think its a great route to interesting beer, much more than lobbing tons of big hops into a fermenter etc.
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Womble
Along with John Palmer's How to Brew, this the best brewing book I have ever bought.  There was a direct positive impact on my brewing. Wish it had been available when I started.

index.jpeg 
There's quite a lot of info in there regarding multiple yeast strains & how to keep a yeast ranch. 
Multi-tasking, easy, drink beer and watch telly.
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Womble
Clibit wrote:


People often pitch Windsor and Nottingham together. Windsor for its flavour, Nottingham for attenuation. Windsor often stops at a pretty high gravity like 1020. Ive done S33 with Nottingham, same reason. Im more interested now in multi strain brewing for flavour complexity. White labs is doing mixed strains too, saison blends etc. Saison plus brett. I think its a great route to interesting beer, much more than lobbing tons of big hops into a fermenter etc.


So, what were your conclusions regarding S33 + Nott ?  I would only use each individual yeast if it were the only thing I could get hold of.

S33 is my go-to yeast for turbo cider however. 


Multi-tasking, easy, drink beer and watch telly.
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Clibit
Womble wrote:


So, what were your conclusions regarding S33 + Nott ?  I would only use each individual yeast if it were the only thing I could get hold of.

S33 is my go-to yeast for turbo cider however. 



The beer was pretty good as I remember. It was something i intended to do again but never did. S33 gave a bit of fruitiness I've not had from other dried yeasts, and the attenuation was good, presumably thanks to the Notty. It was ok but there's much better liquid options. I have had better results, i think, more recently, with M36.  
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Womble
Clibit wrote:


 I have had better results, i think, more recently, with M36.  


Thanks ... confirms what I was thinking, so I'll not be trying S33 + Nott
Multi-tasking, easy, drink beer and watch telly.
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hichaechoc
If you want the flavour of Windsor but the attenuation of Nottingham would you pitch the Windsor first and introduce the Nottingham when the gravity is approaching 1020?
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