Bunglebrewsbeer
What would be a good water profile to aim at fir a pane English ale. Prob more malt lead ideally.
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Robert

According to bru'n water - available for free download, blah blah...

https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/

mg/l: Calcium 50; Magnesium 5; Sodium 5; Sulphate 55; Chloride 70; Bicarbonate 0.

Calcium = >50 to prevent undesirable reactions. Other than that, the only ones that really matter (within limits) are Sulphate & Chloride.

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Simonh82
Bunglebrewsbeer wrote:
What would be a good water profile to aim at fir a pane English ale. Prob more malt lead ideally.


Plane or pale English ale?

For a malty forward pale ale where you aren't looking for the hops to be too prominent I might aim for something like

Ca-100ppm
Mg-5ppm
Na- 20ppm
SO3-50
Cl-100
Residual alkalinity of 40ppm CaCO3 or under.
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Bunglebrewsbeer
Ta I'll have a play later.
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Clibit
Bunglebrewsbeer wrote:
Ta I'll have a play later.


Matt, I really wouldn't over stress about this myself. Ok, I'm not a top level brewer with scientific knowledge, but I've done a fair amount of reading and talking to brewers. 

You and I are very lucky, we have lovely, very soft water from a lake in Cumbria. I have plugged the water data into several water calculators. Several times. The only additions worth making, it seems to me, are gypsum and calcium chloride. The Marble brewery agrees.

Different amounts for different styles. But even then, it's just a suggestion, it's actually about personal preference, just as any other ingredient is. Gypsum accentuates bitterness and hoppiness, chloride accentuates malty sweetness. Roughly speaking. There's no right and wrong, no holy grail.

Look at the debates people are having about NE IPA. A new style with no settled water profile. There is a general agreement that they should have more chloride than other IPAs and pale beers. It's breaking the so called rules. I've seen people suggesting a lot more chloride than gypsum, and others suggesting equal amounts. It's personal taste. 

I put two teaspoons of gypsum in a hoppy beer. Intend to go one of each in darker beers. Sometimes two of one and one of the other. I just like simple solutions. You need to add one or both I think, as the calcium is required in the mash, ideally.

The other tip I picked up is to steep dark grains separately. Our water is not ideal for mashing with them, they affect the PH. Or you can add them for the last twenty minutes of the mash, after conversion has pretty much completed. 
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Halfacrem
Has anyone used Five Star 5.2 PH Stabiliser? 

https://www.brewuk.co.uk/5star5-2.html

It seems like a very simple method of getting a decent Mash PH, but at the same time seems a bit 'too good to be true'

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Simonh82
Halfacrem wrote:
Has anyone used Five Star 5.2 PH Stabiliser? 

https://www.brewuk.co.uk/5star5-2.html

It seems like a very simple method of getting a decent Mash PH, but at the same time seems a bit 'too good to be true'



I think the general consensus is that it is too good to be true. It works but it loads the water up with lots of salts which can affect the flavour in undesirable ways. If you need to lower your mash pH then you are better off treating with something like phosphoric or lactic acid, or using CRS which is a proprietary mixture or sulphuric and hydrochloric acids.
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