GHW
This is an interesting and tempting idea. Using fruit in a beer as the source of yeast.

https://beerandbrewing.com/brewing-beers-with-wild-fruit/

I like the idea of lobbing a load of raspberries into a wheat beer and letting it ferment naturally
But how much raspberries (for instance) would you need?

The article rather neglects this bit of info
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Clibit
GHW wrote:
This is an interesting and tempting idea. Using fruit in a beer as the source of yeast.

https://beerandbrewing.com/brewing-beers-with-wild-fruit/

I like the idea of lobbing a load of raspberries into a wheat beer and letting it ferment naturally
But how much raspberries (for instance) would you need?

The article rather neglects this bit of info


You will get wild yeast, and sour beer, and its a gamble. Could go horribly wrong. But a great thing to try!
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Steve
Cider comes to mind.
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Clibit
https://www.homebrewinguk.com/post/adding-fruit-to-beers-8222283?pid=1293214696
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GHW
If you read the article it claims that most yeast found on fruit is sacch. I assumed otherwise but not the case apparently
Still a risk though as Christ knows what’s going in there!
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GHW


Lots of articles like this, but I’ve found none (outside of the OP) that work on the basis that the fruit is the yeast source, rather than an addition to an already fermented beer
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Pesho77

 you can always make a starter and taste it and see then scale up from there.

 Pesh
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Clibit
GHW wrote:


Lots of articles like this, but I’ve found none (outside of the OP) that work on the basis that the fruit is the yeast source, rather than an addition to an already fermented beer


I linked this for guidance on quantities sorry.

Ive put fruit in beers before and ended up with a mess. Its definitely a gamble. Like Pesh says, test it out. IMO. 
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John Barleycorn

I know from personal experience there are wild yeasts on elderberry blossom and I believe the same is true of apple blossom.
I wouldn't imagine that vast quantities of blossom would need to be harvested to capture a sample and farm from it.
Some materials mentioned of old like birch twigs are apparently of themselves the source of some wild yeast.

I believe that you don't bung whatever the material is directly into the wort but rather use the material to create a starter.


This web page contains some interesting and relevant material:

 https://www.chelseagreen.com/2018/in-search-of-wild-yeast/


The author suggests experimenting with natural materials trialled in sugar water to find sources of local yeasts, then using successful ones to make a brew.


Pascal Baudar, a teacher and author wrote:

I actually brewed some primitive beers by just placing unripe pinecones in the cold wort to ferment, and it worked like a charm.

Most wild yeast will die at around 5 to 6 percent alcohol, although I’ve had some wild yeast going higher, such as the yeast from my local elderberries.

There is something special about being able to create an interesting alcoholic drink using only hyperlocal ingredients from your own garden or the local wilderness.




This writer is the author of a book on the subject. [mentioned on the website]


The Wildcrafting Brewer

by Pascal Baudar

Creating Unique Drinks and Boozy Concoctions from Nature's Ingredients

$29.95


not a cheap read but looks at least to be an authoritative work.







hoptimism - the realisation that each pint carries you forward to an ever more perfect ale...
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John Barleycorn
GHW wrote:
This is an interesting and tempting idea. Using fruit in a beer as the source of yeast.

https://beerandbrewing.com/brewing-beers-with-wild-fruit/

I like the idea of lobbing a load of raspberries into a wheat beer and letting it ferment naturally
But how much raspberries (for instance) would you need?

The article rather neglects this bit of info


I suggest, from my reading, that you don't add the fruit straight into the wort. First make a starter from your fruit [perhaps using malt sugars?] then brew from this starter culture. As with most starters a large quantity to begin is probably not necessary.

If you simply want fruit flavoured beer then obviously a significant quantity of material/fruit will need to be present.


hoptimism - the realisation that each pint carries you forward to an ever more perfect ale...
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Pinto
I remember hearing an interview with the guy who owns Yeast Bay and he was mentioning that fruit arent the ideal sources of yeast you'd expect they were - the best source being leaf mould from the floor of woods and forests !

Not sure what that would bring to the beer tho...woody notes perhaps? [rofl]
Beer is like porn - you can buy it easily enough, but its so much more fun to make it [wink]
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John Barleycorn
Having read into this subject a little deeper it does occur to me that experimenting with wild yeast could create problems.
Your equipment and brewing area could become 'infected' by that new yeast you invited in. After all much of brewing method is about keeping out these wild strains.
Perhaps it would be wise to use separate equipment dedicated to experimentation and keep day to day brewing gear well apart from it.
hoptimism - the realisation that each pint carries you forward to an ever more perfect ale...
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Clibit
I think the issue is that you don't know what mix of yeast and bacteria you will get. 
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John Barleycorn

Here's another link on the same subject:

https://bootlegbiology.com/diy/capturing-yeast/

 

 ...a good practical intro to capturing and farming yeasts 



here's a simple set of instructions from that site, view the site for more in depth:

IMG_6517

Seriously.

  1. Unwrap sterile cotton swab.
  2. Swab appetizing fruit, fermentation vessel, or enthusiastic volunteer.
  3. Place in a sanitized centrifuge tube, seal, and store in a dark place until you’re ready to start fermentation.
  4. Create low gravity (1.010-1.020) unhopped starter wort and pour into a sterilized container with a lid, like a jar or another centrifuge tube.
  5. Remove your cotton swabs and dunk/swirl the swab end into the starter wort several times until the swab is fully saturated, and any dust on the swab has made it into the wort.
  6. Within a few days you should see the normal signs of fermentation. 

Next time you do a brewery tour, take cotton swabs!! [rofl]
It would be, at least, a good conversation starter.

Derelict breweries, anyone?




hoptimism - the realisation that each pint carries you forward to an ever more perfect ale...
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John Barleycorn
Clibit wrote:
I think the issue is that you don't know what mix of yeast and bacteria you will get. 


...and more importantly how easy will it be to show them the door once you have invited them in.
The guest that doesn't know it is time to leave?
...could be paranoia, starsan cures all!

hoptimism - the realisation that each pint carries you forward to an ever more perfect ale...
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