Clibit
So we've had a few years of craft breweries making a big thing of the whole Conan/Vermont/Hazy IPA craze. What's it all about?!!! Is the hazy NEIPA the whole story? Or have these yeasts been used more widely? If so, how? Which yeast strains are best? Are they all nicked from Heady Topper? Are they all English? Can English ales be made with them successfully?

What strains are available? 

WhiteLabs Burlington ale.
White Labs London Fog
Wyeast 1318
Imperial A38 Juice
Imperial A04 Barbarian
Yeast Bay Vermont
Omega DIPA
GigaYeast Vermont IPA

I'm sure there are others. But are these all either Conan or 1318 London III ?

Anyone used any of them and, if so, what for? Would they be good across a number of styles?

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Gregles
Crossmyloof are offering some new yeasts and they are now doing one called Haze. I haven't used it unfortunately.

https://www.crossmyloofbrew.co.uk/yeast-specs
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GHW
I’ve used yeast bay Vermont and 1318 extensively though I’ve not used 1318 in hoppy beer and I’ve not used Vermont in not-hoppy beer.

They are different. I’d say 1318 finishes a tiny bit sweet which works well for me in English bitters. It also has a distinctive taste (Ester profile?) which I really like. I’ve used it in a boddies clone, bitters, English ipa, brown ale, and it’s done a great job on them all.

Vermont leaves a fluffy mouthfeel and accentuates any fruit flavours in hops. I don’t control fermentation temps so can’t offer any advice on how they perform at different temps.

I’m tempted to give the London fog a go in an neipa this autumn. I need to branch out, yeast wise!

I suspect these variants are all much the same yeast. Once Vermont ale got popular everyone will have jumped on the bandwagon.

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Clibit
London Fog gets good reviews. Be good to know which of the above strains are the same. 
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Clibit
Some clarity from the info on each strain, which seem to divide into two groups, Conan and London Ale III. Both types originate from English breweries, so I fancy trying both in English ales, and currently have an English ale with A38 (London Ale) in an FV.

Yeast Bay Vermont WLP4000:
"Isolated from a uniquely crafted double IPA out of the Northeastern United States, this yeast produces a balanced fruity ester profile of peaches and light citrus that complements any aggressively hopped beer. Expect this strain to take off fast and ferment wort quickly, though elevating the temperature following the bulk of fermentation may be required to raise the attenuation. In order to achieve high attenuation, we recommend fermenting at 67-69 ºF for 3-4 days, and then raising the temperature to 72 ºF until a stable gravity is reached. We also recommend mashing at 148-149 ºF and adding a small percentage of the fermentables (~ 5-10%) as sugar. Attenuation has also been reported to increase when repitching after the first generation. Temperature: 66 - 70 ºF Attenuation: 75 - 82% Flocculation: Medium-Low

White Labs Burlington Ale WLP095:  (Can this be same as WLP4000, both out of White Labs, but different branding??
This yeast is the signature strain for a brewery in the Northeast United States, making it ideal for New England-style IPAs. Adding personality to your beer by contributing esters and body, this strain will blend with hop flavors and aromas while balancing bitterness. Esters are higher than WLP001 California Ale Yeast® and this strain has been known to result in more diacetyl increasing the temperature at the end of fermentation is suggested.
Attenuation: 73.00-78.00 Flocculation: Medium  Alcohol Tolerance: Medium - High (8 - 12%)  Optimum Fermentation Temperature: 67.00-70.00

Imperial Barbarian A04 (Conan/Vermont or similar surely?)
Ready to attack your IPA, Barbarian produces stone fruit esters that work great when paired with citrus hops. Barbarian will give you what you need for an exceptionally balanced IPA.
TEMP: 62-70F, 16-21C // FLOCCULATION: MEDIUM // ATTENUATION: 73-74%

Omega DIPA Ale OYL-052
A strong fermenter popularly referred to as “Conan.” Its peach, apricot and pineapple notes are steroids for hops, complementing modern fruity hop profiles in particular. A diacetyl rest is suggested if fermented in the lower temperature range.
Flocc Med-Low   Attenuation 72-80%  Temp 65-72%  11% ABV
 
Giga Yeast 0Y054 Vermont IPA  (not sure what this is but people say peach flavours, which suggests Conan)
From one of the best examples of an east coast IPA. This yeast attenuates slightly less than NorCal Ale #1 and leaves a beer with more body and a slight fruity ester that is amazing with aromatic hops. Good choice for high gravity beers and hoppy styles. Broad temperature range and moderate flocculation make this yeast a versatile house strain.
Attenuation Medium Gravity*78% - 82%
Attenuation High Gravity*74% - 76% (10.0% - 10.6% ABV)
Temperature Range†62˚F – 75˚F
FlocculationMedium/Low


Wyeast 1318: Originating from a traditional London brewery, this yeast has a wonderful malt and hop profile. It is a true top cropping strain with a fruity, very light and softly balanced palate. This strain will finish slightly sweet.
High Flocculation   71-75% Attenuation  64-74F Fermentation  10% ABV


White Labs WLP066  London Fog (White Labs version of 1318 London III?)
This is the go-to strain for New England-style IPAs. It produces a medium ester profile similar to WLP008 East Coast Ale Yeast. It leaves some residual sweetness, helping accentuate both malt and hop flavors and aromas, while retaining a velvety mouthfeel.
Attenuation: 65.00-70.00  Flocculation: Medium to Low  Alcohol Tolerance: Medium - High (8 - 12%)  Optimum Fermentation Temperature: 64.00-72.00
Imperial A38 Juice  (This is believed to be Wyeast 1318 strain)
Juicy. Fruity. Juice is an amazing strain for East Coast IPAs. The ester profile of Juice brings out the aromas and flavors of the new school hops and creates a beer that is greater than the sum of its parts. Keep an eye on this strain, it likes to move to the top of fermentation and will climb out the fermenter if too full.
TEMP: 64-74F, 18-23C // FLOCCULATION: MEDIUM // ATTENUATION: 72-76%



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GHW
Re imperial juice; if the bit about climbing out of the fermenter is true then I don’t think it is 1318 as I’ve never experienced that.
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Clibit
GHW wrote:
Re imperial juice; if the bit about climbing out of the fermenter is true then I don’t think it is 1318 as I’ve never experienced that.


It hasn't climbed out of my fermenter. A good solid top cropper but krausen only a regular thickness. Quite a lot of people on forums saying they are the same strain, but there's lots of made up stuff out there. Maybe, maybe not.
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HisDudeness
Clibit wrote:


It hasn't climbed out of my fermenter. A good solid top cropper but krausen only a regular thickness. Quite a lot of people on forums saying they are the same strain, but there's lots of made up stuff out there. Maybe, maybe not.


I didn't have any issues with it escaping either, I have only seen it listed as equivalent to 1318 which kind of makes sense if Barbarian is Conan/Vermont which it must surely be with that name!

I think Conan/Vermont is a good general purpose IPA/Pale ale yeast when you want to accentuate the hops fruitiness, doesn't have to be for hazy or NEIPA style beers in fact I found it actually cleared down quite bright when I used it in a pale with a standard grist.
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Clibit
HisDudeness wrote:

I think Conan/Vermont is a good general purpose IPA/Pale ale yeast when you want to accentuate the hops fruitiness, doesn't have to be for hazy or NEIPA style beers in fact I found it actually cleared down quite bright when I used it in a pale with a standard grist.


Have you used it in an English bitter/pale/IPA?
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Hops_and_Dreams
I've used the yeast bay version, but only in a pale and regular IPA. I like it, but does anyone else find it's the dominating flavour?
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HisDudeness
Clibit wrote:


Have you used it in an English bitter/pale/IPA?


I haven't but I can't see any reason not to, most of them seem to originate from fruity english ale strains anyway
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Clibit
HisDudeness wrote:


I haven't but I can't see any reason not to, most of them seem to originate from fruity english ale strains anyway


That's what I'm thinking, but Hops may have a point - the peachy thing may dominate in a less hop assertive beer?
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HisDudeness
Clibit wrote:


That's what I'm thinking, but Hops may have a point - the peachy thing may dominate in a less hop assertive beer?


quite possibly but could maybe manage that with fermentation temp? not sure where the ester sweet spot is for that yeast though
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Clibit
HisDudeness wrote:


quite possibly but could maybe manage that with fermentation temp? not sure where the ester sweet spot is for that yeast though


The ester sweet spot? Like on a golf club?

 
golf.jpg 

Yes cool temp is probably the answer!
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HisDudeness
yeah exactly and that spot kind of looks like a peach so good analogy! [rofl]
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