GHW

I won’t get to this til after summer but for a while I’ve wanted to try a Brut IPA.

i know they are faddy, and that the fad has probably already passed, but I fancy giving it a go.

i was also toying with what I might do next with WLP644 and realised it might be a good yeast to use for the Brut(e).

so I think I’ll do a split batch, do 10L or so with the 644 straight, then do another 5L or so with the enzymes to create the brut

recipe ideas:
light grist; pale, a tiny bit of crystal. Nothing protein heavy that will leave it cloudy.

hops: nelson (winey), mosaic (popular choice for the style), poss citra for some Sauvignon mango, and eldorado for pear (think prosecco) and to leave a little residual sweetness in the super dry beer.

that should give a good mix for the tropical and leave the brut full of the right kinds of fruit for the style, with the yeast kicking out plenty of its own pineapple and peach too.

not sure about dry hopping etc but I’ll work that out later

good idea /bad idea?

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Clibit
Definitely a good idea to experiment with a few litres. A mate has made a few Brut IPAs and he's getting good at it. For me the dryness from 644 is enough, without the enzyme. They've been mouth puckering, and I can handle most things. I started to really enjoy the last one as the glass began to run out. But you gotta give it a go. 

Maybe you're over complicating the hops? I think I'd simplify, maybe down to two hops? 
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GHW
Could get very very dry I agree, hence a bit of crystal and the Eldorado. Probably wouldn’t use all four hops. I’d drop the citra first.

hopefully now everyone’s moved on it’ll be easy to get the amyloglucosadise 
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Pinto
Our local, Curious brew, secondary ferment their lager with champagne yeast and it becomes exceptionally dry.  They also use Nelson Sauvin as the aroma hop... its too much.  For this reason, I dont think Brut IPA would be for me personally.
Beer is like porn - you can buy it easily enough, but its so much more fun to make it [wink]
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EspeciallyBitter
I like the sound of your hop choices, but I've tried a few brut ales and they are a little too dry for my tastes. It's a bit like hopped ciders, just too mouth-puckering for me. If I'm in the mood for that I'll have a mixed drink with bitters or a nice dry wine.
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Clibit
I like the sound of your hop choices, but I've tried a few brut ales and they are a little too dry for my tastes. It's a bit like hopped ciders, just too mouth-puckering for me. If I'm in the mood for that I'll have a mixed drink with bitters or a nice dry wine.


Or a dry beer that's not been stripped down to zero.

But why does it work in saisons. Some of those yeasts take out all the sugars. 
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EspeciallyBitter
Clibit wrote:

Or a dry beer that's not been stripped down to zero.

But why does it work in saisons. Some of those yeasts take out all the sugars. 

I think brut beers are another style where the focus is on the hops and little else (in my ill-informed opinion, I'm sure). So stripping everything out is the point, maybe? It's an approach that doesn't often work for me but is obviously amazingly popular. I think it works in saisons because there's some fruitiness and yeast character that adds to the overall experience. And I've had the odd thin saison that tasted a bit like someone tipped a bit of white pepper into a club soda.
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Pinto
Clibit wrote:


Or a dry beer that's not been stripped down to zero.

But why does it work in saisons. Some of those yeasts take out all the sugars. 


Some yeasts strip all the character from the brew if the simple sugars are high, whereas Saison yeasts add phenolics and esters as part of the profile.  For examplee, as I mentioned above, champagne yeast is terrible for creating alcoholic soda water; its why I stopped using it for ciders.
Beer is like porn - you can buy it easily enough, but its so much more fun to make it [wink]
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GHW

Pinto wrote:


Some yeasts strip all the character from the brew if the simple sugars are high, whereas Saison yeasts add phenolics and esters as part of the profile.  For examplee, as I mentioned above, champagne yeast is terrible for creating alcoholic soda water; its why I stopped using it for ciders.


and wlp644 kicks off a ton of fruit which was the point in its selection. It won’t strip everything away it’ll add something too. Dryness will be the challenge but I think that could be managed with hop selection. We’ll see anyway (eventually). 


it’ll be fun trying even if I end up making astringent fizzy hop water

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Tigermoth
GHW wrote:


and wlp644 kicks off a ton of fruit which was the point in its selection. It won’t strip everything away it’ll add something too. Dryness will be the challenge but I think that could be managed with hop selection. We’ll see anyway (eventually). 

 


it’ll be fun trying even if I end up making astringent fizzy hop water

Hop-e-fully you will get that tropical taste they you like Gareth.

[wave]
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Clibit
Some info here about Brut IPA from the guy who came up with the idea.

https://www.beeradvocate.com/articles/18074/kim-sturdavant-brewmaster-at-social-kitchen-brewery-on-creating-the-brut-ipa/

And a discussion about whether Brut IPA has a future...

https://www.beeradvocate.com/articles/17913/does-the-brut-ipa-have-a-future/

"What is probably the most difficult aspect of the style is getting the bitterness and hop character to balance out with zero residual sweetness,”

“Some control systems [in Boulevard’s automated brewery] that read density couldn’t tell the difference between water and Brut IPA because of its low finishing gravity,”

What I find ironic is that a Brut IPA bears more than a passing resemblance to mainstream macro lager,” says Markowski of Two Roads. “Brut IPAs are highly attenuated, have low bitterness, need to be made with adjuncts or use amyloglucosidase enzyme (originally marketed to brewers to produce light beers), tend to be highly carbonated, pale, and clear. The difference—and it’s not a minor difference—are the typically higher alcohol contents and the high rate of whirlpool and dry hopping that goes into a typical Brut IPA.”
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GHW
His idea of adding the enzyme on the hot side matches my thinking, though I’d be doing of necessity as I don’t want to inoculate the whole batch with the amyloglucosadise.

we’ll see. I’m definitely going to do this alongside a similar recipe 644 beer
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