Clibit
How to make an Extract brew:

 1. Heat water: Add 6 to 10 litres of water to your pot.

 2. Steep Grains: Pour crushed steeping grain (if you are using grains) into a mesh bag and tie the open end in a knot. Put them in the water and apply heat. Steep grains for 20/30 minutes or until water reaches 78°C. Remove bag.

 3. Add extract: With the heat switched off, add half the malt extract to the wort and stir it in thoroughly.

 4. Boil wort: Return wort to the boil
- Add bittering hops and boil for 60 minutes. There are recipes with shorter boil times but 60 mins is common.
- Add flavour and aroma hops at the times stated in the recipe, the times quotes are usually the number of minutes from the end of the boil.

6. Cool wort: After a one hour boil switch the heat off and cool the wort to around 40°C as rapidly as possible. Use a wort chiller, or put the kettle in an ice bath in your sink.

7.  Sanitise equipment: While the wort cools, sanitize the fermenting equipment – fermenter, lid or stopper, fermentation lock, sieve, hydrometer etc – along with the yeast pack and a pair of scissors.

8. Transfer to FV: Fill primary fermenter with 9 litres of cold water, then pour in the cooled wort via the sanitised sieve to catch the hops. Leave any thick sludge in the bottom of the kettle.

9. Add rest of Extract and top up: Stir in the rest of the malt extract thoroughly and add more cold water as needed to bring the volume to the desired level and stir thoroughly again.

10. Measure specific gravity of the wort with a hydrometer and record.

11. Pitch yeast once the wort is at pitching temperature. Use sanitized scissors to cut off a corner of the yeast pack, and carefully pour the yeast into the primary fermenter.

12. Aerate the wort by either shaking the FV if the lid is secure, or stir vigorously with a spoon or whisk that's been sanitised. This will provide oxygen for the yeast and mix the yeast in too for a faster start.

13. Seal the fermenter and place it in a suitable place to maintain as steady a temperature as possible. You want an ambient temperature around 16-18C if possible as the rapid period of fermentation will raise the wort temperature above ambient.

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chub1
This is pretty well my method and punching recipes through recipe builder.
I know most regulars are AG brewers(and i will have a go) but it's such an easy if more expensive method of producing some really good beers fairly quickly on the stove without the need for lots of gear.
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Clibit
I totally agree chub, even AG brewers can benefit from an occasional extract brew to make soime good quality beer very quickly. Check this out:

http://beerandwinejournal.com/speedy-homebrewing/

There's a great video at the bottom of the page. 
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chub1
Clibit wrote:
I totally agree chub, even AG brewers can benefit from an occasional extract brew to make soime good quality beer very quickly. Check this out:

http://beerandwinejournal.com/speedy-homebrewing/

There's a great video at the bottom of the page. 

[thumb]
It has allowed me to make far better quality beer than i have from kits. I am also really enjoying doing small batches and experimenting with different hops and grains.
I made one small batch of 'ordinary bitter', only 10 bottles which i opened up at the weekend for others to try. It got really good reviews and my lad even asked if i would brew it in quantity for his proposed wedding next year, so can't be much wrong with it[cool]
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Clibit
I think using dried extract and grains and hops, you can get pretty close to AG quality. People win competitions doing it. 
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Notlaw
I've been looking at LME recently and thinking about doing some partial mash batches for ease.

I seen this on Amazon https://www.amazon.co.uk/Suma-Malt-Extract-3-18-kg/dp/B005KRFNS2/ref=sr_1_1_a_it?ie=UTF8&qid=1465823595&sr=8-1&keywords=suma+malt+extract and it's the equivalent of about 5.3Kg of pale malt, so all you need to add is some specialty grains and you're flying.!  It work out at the equivalent grain cost of paying £2.35 per kilo; I pay about £1.60 per kilo for MO, so it's not prohibitively more expensive.
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Clibit
You could order HBC LME when you get an order, £4.95 for 1.5kg. 

I prefer DME though. 
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chub1
Notlaw wrote:
I've been looking at LME recently and thinking about doing some partial mash batches for ease.

I seen this on Amazon https://www.amazon.co.uk/Suma-Malt-Extract-3-18-kg/dp/B005KRFNS2/ref=sr_1_1_a_it?ie=UTF8&qid=1465823595&sr=8-1&keywords=suma+malt+extract and it's the equivalent of about 5.3Kg of pale malt, so all you need to add is some specialty grains and you're flying.!  It work out at the equivalent grain cost of paying £2.35 per kilo; I pay about £1.60 per kilo for MO, so it's not prohibitively more expensive.

Would that be re-sealable? Guess for 40 odd pints you would use it all at once

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Notlaw
Clibit wrote:
You could order HBC LME when you get an order, £4.95 for 1.5kg. 

I prefer DME though. 


Any reason other than better control over how much you use, that you prefer DME to LME?  I'd go for LME if I was going to use the whole lot in one go, but I'll use DME for when I start using liquid yeasts, for making a starter.
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Clibit
Ive had better results with DME. 
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Notlaw
Clibit wrote:
Ive had better results with DME. 


Fair enough... I can't argue with that.
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Clibit
You can get 3kg of DME for £14 from HBC. Which compares pretty well with cheap LME. It's less than £5 / kg, and it's more concentrated than LME. 

1kg DME = 1.25kg LME, approx.
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Notlaw
Clibit wrote:
You can get 3kg of DME for £14 from HBC. Which compares pretty well with cheap LME. It's less than £5 / kg, and it's more concentrated than LME. 

1kg DME = 1.25kg LME, approx.


Thats not too bad actually.  3kg of DME is roughly the equivalent of 5kg of grain, which makes it the equivalent of £2.80 per kilo for grain vs the £1.60 ish that I actually pay.  So, not that much more expensive compared with what the perception is.
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Clibit
Yes, and there are costs to mashing grain, and extra time too.

Though I buy Minch malt on HBC for less than £1/kg. That Minch range is really good. 
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Notlaw
Once I've "spec'd up" a bit I'll start buying grain in bigger quantities to save a bob or two.  I currently just buy it from Leyland who are good on price, but you don't save anything for buying bigger quantities, so I tend to just buy it in 1.5kg bags.

You're not the first person I've heard saying that Minch malt is really good, I'll have to give it a go.
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