Clibit
This is a pretty fool proof recipe using malt extract, crystal malt, centennial hops and dried yeast that will make a really delicious IPA.

Centennial IPA Extract (American IPA)

Original Gravity (OG): 1.053 
Final Gravity (FG): 1.012 
ABV: 5.4 %
Bitterness: 44 IBUs
Boil Time: 60 minutes

Ingredients:

Malt & Sugar:
2.500 kg Dry Light Malt Extract or 3.000 kg Pale Liquid Malt Extract
0.250 kg Brewing Sugar
0.200 kg Crystal Malt (crushed)

Hops:
15.0 g Centennial Leaf (13.5% Alpha) @ 30 Minutes (Boil)
25.0 g Centennial Leaf (13.5% Alpha) @ 20 Minutes (Boil)
25.0 g Centennial Leaf (13.5% Alpha) @ 5 Minutes (Boil)
35.0 g Centennial Leaf (13.5% Alpha) @ 0 Days (Dry Hop)

Ferment at 18-20°C with Safale US-05 Dry Yeast

1. Place crystal malt in a small muslin or mesh bag and add to about 10 litres of cold water in a large cooking pot. Raise the heat and take the grains out after 20 -30 mins, or when the water reaches about 75C. 

2. Switch the heat off and mix half the malt extract into the water, then bring to the boil.

3. Once boiling, add 15g of Centennial hops. 10 mins later add 25g of hops, and 15 mins after that add 25g hops.

4. After another 5 mins, which should be 30 mins after you put the first hops in, switch off the heat. 

5. Take the pot to the sink and place it in cold water. Stir for a while, adding the brewing sugar, then place the lid on the pot and leave for a while. Change the water once, when it has become warm.

6. Add the rest of the malt extract into a sterilised FV with about 5 litres of water and mix thoroughly. 

7. Pour the hopped wort into the FV via a sterilised sieve. (or you could use muslins hops bags when you boil the hops).

8. Top up the FV with cold water to 20 litres. 

9. When the temperature has dropped to about 20C, add the yeast.

10. After a few days, when the fermentation has died down, boil a hop bag to sterilise it and add the dry hops. Bottle or keg the beer 5 days later. 

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Bunglebrewsbeer
Think I'm going to give centennial a go on its own in the not to distant future.
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Clibit
It's a great hop for a single hop pale or IPA.
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Steve
The first time i used this hop was in your Brown Ale and i must say i do like it, will be using it more in the near future 
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Notlaw
It's a great one, I've just bought some more to use. Such a beaut. 
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Clibit
It's a hop that is hard not to like, I think, just tastes great, and works in so many beers.
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GHW
Dragging up an old topic for a clarification on extract brewing as I haven't done one for a while. I'm going to use half my extract for the full boil but shouldn't the other half be added to the boil for a short while at least (10m say) just to sanitise? I'm sure that's how I did it when I used extract recipe kits?
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chub1
GHW wrote:
Dragging up an old topic for a clarification on extract brewing as I haven't done one for a while. I'm going to use half my extract for the full boil but shouldn't the other half be added to the boil for a short while at least (10m say) just to sanitise? I'm sure that's how I did it when I used extract recipe kits?

Gareth
I have done extracts with part added at start and part added at end and also the last part added to the FV with no harm done !
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GHW
Think I'll chuck it in the boil for a few mins!
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PeterPi
I've been given a Wilko "Triple Hopped IPA Kit".  I've included the instructions below (sorry about the skew). They go on to tell you to sprinkle the yeast and add the hops on day four.

Is there anything special about brewing sugar. I assume the bittering hops are already in the extract as it's called Hopped Malt Extract. I'll use my own yeast and hops.

Any tips would be appreciated.


Wilkp Brew.jpg 


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GHW
Brewing sugar is dextrose vs table sugar which is sucrose
Arguable how much difference they make in small quantities but many argue at larger volumes dextrose is better, gives a smoother flavour.
If you can get dried malt extract to add instead it will give you a much better final beer
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PeterPi
GHW wrote:
Brewing sugar is dextrose vs table sugar which is sucrose
Arguable how much difference they make in small quantities but many argue at larger volumes dextrose is better, gives a smoother flavour.
If you can get dried malt extract to add instead it will give you a much better final beer


The DME is quite a bit more expensive isn't it. Would I use the same quantity?

The brewing sugar is cheaper and easier to get so I may use half the can with sugar and the other half with DME.
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Clibit
PeterPi wrote:


The DME is quite a bit more expensive isn't it. Would I use the same quantity?

The brewing sugar is cheaper and easier to get so I may use half the can with sugar and the other half with DME.


I find brewing sugar better than regular sugar. Brew enhancer is good, its half DME and half brewing sugar. But don't fret, use whatever you have or can get. Grain is better and cheaper than kits though.
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Pesho77

 I would use sugar over extract because its another malt and so a different flavour unless you planned that to be a part of the recipe.

 Pesh
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