Clibit
I've discovered Sauergut!
 
Sauergut is a running supply of soured wort, about a gallon apparently, just topped up with fresh wort every time you use some to sour a beer. The fresh wort becomes soured bu the lactobacillus in the remaining wort you add it to. I like this, it's on my agenda for very soon, for adapting beers, maybe adding to part of a batch. Could always add some fruit too.

Here's a recipe:

https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/499329/sauergut


"Do not boil. Strain, and cool to 120 degrees. 

Put 2 to 3 ounces of whole pale malt in a gallon jug (demijohn) and transfer the wort over it. Top up all the way with boiled (deoxygenated) water and cover with plastic wrap and a rubber band. Don't leave more than 1/2 inch of headspace. Hold at 118 degrees for at least 3 days to sour, then it can be stored at room temperature.

Use to acidify the mash of future beers (it should be about 2% lactic acid) and top the jug back up with fresh unhopped wort to keep it going."


 
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GHW
I thought it was the after effects of your first sour brew

Someone had to say it
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Robbie
yup its the German way for biological acidification of the mash and/or wort (if you need to) Taste is entirely different from using industrial lacto or acid malt. Its a mini souring tank for sure It only makes sense though it you are brewing continuously, like every week :D
Beer is an expression of the human spirit. . . we use technical sciences as a tool to create it but its essence is and always will be a form of art - Handbook of brewing, chapter 2, page 55
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Clibit
MSK wrote:
yup its the German way for biological acidification of the mash and/or wort (if you need to) Taste is entirely different from using industrial lacto or acid malt. Its a mini souring tank for sure It only makes sense though it you are brewing continuously, like every week 😃


Or you can make a small batch when you brew, like a starter.
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Halfacrem
Exactly what I did for my Sour beer. 

I reckon you could make a bigger batch than is needed and freeze a portion. You can do the same with a sourdough starter. The yeasties go to sleepies in the freezer and they wake up after thawing and an addition of some fresh wort. 
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Clibit
Halfacrem wrote:
Exactly what I did for my Sour beer. 

I reckon you could make a bigger batch than is needed and freeze a portion. You can do the same with a sourdough starter. The yeasties go to sleepies in the freezer and they wake up after thawing and an addition of some fresh wort. 


People seem to keep it going like a sourdough starter. Use some of it, top up with some fresh wort. 
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