Robert

They're expensive.

Hops used for dry-hopping lose all their hop oils but only lose a small amount of their alpha acid.

If you want neutral bitterness and want to save some readies why not squeeze them dry and use as first additions in the kettle for the next brew. Might be good for replicating historical recipes that utilised older hops too.

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Fermented Culture
You could sparge the hops if you are using a hop back also...

or feed them to cattle to stop their flatulence 😉.
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Robert

Fermented Culture wrote:
You could sparge the hops if you are using a hop back also...

or feed them to cattle to stop their flatulence 😉.

We can save the world from the global warming caused by cattle farming. Yey!

I feed my spent grain and hops to the sheep around the house by tossing them over the fence. Don't tell anyone, though I haven't spotted any dead afterwards.

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GHW
I do use a lot of dry hops but I honestly can't see me myself doing this. Second hand hops don't sound like they'd make a good beer!
But if someone tries and it works, let me know. I could probably halve my hop budget!
Would they contribute the same ibus?
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Robert

GHW wrote:
I do use a lot of dry hops but I honestly can't see me myself doing this. Second hand hops don't sound like they'd make a good beer! But if someone tries and it works, let me know. I could probably halve my hop budget! Would they contribute the same ibus?

Not far off. Not a lot of alpha acid leaches into the beer when you dry hop. According to studies the amount of AA in the beer increases by around 6% so there's plenty left in the hops.

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Pesho77
This is something ive wondered about too, i don't dry hop enough to make it fully worth while but a test could be done to see the difference, its probably best to do an IPA then an English ale / bitter / mild, i wouldn't freeze hops they probably will turn to mush and be harder to clean up, i would plan the brew to be done once the dry hops are finished with. 

 My best guess with this is to have whole leaf hops in a hop sock suspended from the top of the fv (so there out of the yeast sediment) then take the whole bag out and dump it straight in your boil kettle, i think id do a single hop addition for the second beer just to be sure.

 Pesh

 Is there nothing on brulosophy about this ? 
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Pesho77
Just had a thought on this one
 
 Which hops would you use to dry hop and bitter with (ie a 60 min boil)

 Pesh
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Northern Brewster
Mosaic has a nice high alpha level so I suppose that would be ok. Maybe Cascade as it’s dual purpose and first gold? There’s probably quite a few you could have a go with.

Interesting idea, although I don’t tend to dry hop a great deal.
I don’t have hobbies. I’m developing a robust post-apocalyptic skill set.
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Robert
Many of the usual suspects for dry hopping are high alpha
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Hops_and_Dreams
Nice idea, but bittering hops are so cheap, I wouldn't bother myself. Plus it's more effort!
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Pinto
This is the reverse of the idea I was listening to the other day on the Experimental Brewing podcast - they were talking about debittered hops - these are left over after they extract the cryo hop extract, with all their flavour /aroma but only 2-3% alpha left.

Personally I wouldn't go to the effort TBH.
Beer is like porn - you can buy it easily enough, but its so much more fun to make it [wink]
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