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Fermented Culture

M41 has a very similar description to Belle Saison which is a type of yeast which can ferment dextrins. It's caused problems in breweries by producing phenols and over carbonating beer but if that's the first time you've used it then I don't think it would be the source. If it is a contamination issue perhaps the Belgian ale yeast was the best beer because there was less food for the microorganisms to use. Be careful with cross contamination with this yeast.

I'm not familiar with troubleshooting the no chill technique, I would have thought that putting hot wort into a fermenter would pasteurise the vessel. Did you use no chill before this problem occurred? Did you change anything in your process for the last 3 beers: ingredients, water, malt, hops, sanitising procedure?

Perhaps the astringency is from the water chemistry or tannins. Over sparging with a high pH or temperature can extract tannins. Are you in a hard water area, perhaps it's the salts or pH? Maybe a bad batch of malt which is crushed too finely?

Do you pasteurise your priming sugar? Is the beer over-carbonated?

It might not be the source of your problems and it's perfectly fine to brew beer without rehydrating but it's still better to do so (increasing the yeast population count).

Hopefully the cleaning will help your problems, it's annoying to lose beer.

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Cqr
I maybe getting some where
I went to my home brew club tonight,with a bottle of Belgian beer
Most peaple liked it ?? So after my shock I tasted it, nice great beer
So some bottles are good, most are bad yuk yuk
??? Could it be the bottling tree, or possibly some bottles
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Clibit
Cqr wrote:
I maybe getting some where
I went to my home brew club tonight,with a bottle of Belgian beer
Most peaple liked it ?? So after my shock I tasted it, nice great beer
So some bottles are good, most are bad yuk yuk
??? Could it be the bottling tree, or possibly some bottles


This is what happened to me too. It must be the bottles, right? As above, get a thorough washing regime, get them really clean, and use a bleach solution. Make sure they stay dry. A good system is thorough soak, bleach, dry, plastic caps. Rinse/Soak bottles straight after pouring beer if you can. Yeast sticks to bottles. Add something to the water to help loosen stuck yeast/gunk. I use soda crystals.
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Chug
I had one batch go tits up, luckily only a small 12 bottle batch, I scrubbed with boiling water and then put the bottles in the oven for half an hour at 150C.
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Cqr
I've vwp' d all my gear
Hope this will kill all the beasties
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Chug
Fingers crossed! [thumb]
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Clibit
I don't use vwp, does it contain bleach? If not I'd get some thin household bleach and soak the bottles, 5ml bleach per litre of water. It's about 30p for two litres.
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Robert
Clibit wrote:
I don't use vwp, does it contain bleach? If not I'd get some thin household bleach and soak the bottles, 5ml bleach per litre of water. It's about 30p for two litres.


It's chlorine based. Pretty lethal stuff too.
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Clibit
Robert wrote:


It's chlorine based. Pretty lethal stuff too.


Ok. So it's as effective as household bleach? Or more so?
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Cqr
Certainly smells of chlorine
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Robert

Clibit wrote:


Ok. So it's as effective as household bleach? Or more so?

Depends how much bleach I suppose. It works as a cleaner/steriliser, kills stuff, doesn't smell of bleach and it rinses out easily. I'd use it in preference to bleach but I don't use it because we have a septic tank that I want as little chlorine to enter as possible.

I clean with hot water to get everything off then use hot water and Sodium Percarbonate to finish.

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Cqr
After 80+ bottles down the sink iam keeping my eye out for pub type kegs
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