Clibit
Interesting experiment. In which it was incredibly difficult to spot any difference between a beer that was boiled and a beer that wasn't. Is boiling unnecessary?!

One beer was boiled for 60 minutes and one was held at 200°F/93°C for 60 minutes.

Not sure how the bitterness of the beers ended up being similar?

http://brulosophy.com/2018/07/02/the-no-boil-effect-exbeeriment-results/
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Pesho77

 I think that isomerisation happens at above 80c ish so id expect them to be the same tbh.

 Pesh
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Clibit
Pesho77 wrote:

 I think that isomerisation happens at above 80c ish so id expect them to be the same tbh.

 Pesh


Oh yes. I copied and pasted the bit above but didnt see the 93C bit. [rofl]

If you're going to hold it st 93C for an hour you'd might as well boil it! [rofl]

Have these Brulosophers got nowt better to do?!
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Pinto
bit a stretch saying that steeping at 93 degrees is "no boil" 😉
Beer is like porn - you can buy it easily enough, but its so much more fun to make it [wink]
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Clibit
Pinto wrote:
bit a stretch saying that steeping at 93 degrees is "no boil" 😉


Technically accurate!
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Clibit
Pinto wrote:
bit a stretch saying that steeping at 93 degrees is "no boil" 😉


Technically accurate!

Maybe this rolling boil mallarkey is a bit of a myth though?
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John Barleycorn
I can already see it. The thermostatically controlled copper, holds your wort at a pre-determined temp for a set period. Any temp between 70-100 degrees centigrade, with a pressure seal mode that enables elevated temperatures of up to 240 centigrade.
Fine tune your kettle, only 1000 guineas ex vat.

I'll bet as long as it gets hot it will do, really.
hoptimism - the realisation that each pint carries you forward to an ever more perfect ale...
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hichaechoc
Clibit wrote:

If you're going to hold it st 93C for an hour you'd might as well boil it! [rofl]


No boil overs, little steam, less energy used - it does have some advantages.

Might be worth a bit of a look since fining with gelatine would probably give a clear beer.

Also makes me wonder what high altitude brewers do, water boils at 95C in Denver...

EDIT article on high altitude brewing here
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Womble
Clibit wrote:


Technically accurate!

Maybe this rolling boil mallarkey is a bit of a myth though?


I think the theory goes something along the lines of boiling off DMS from the malt, hitting the boil in order to allow coagulation of proteins and breaking up of the whole hops to allow the isomerisation of the hop acids

I do everything at a simmer with the lid on.  My logic being ...

- it uses less gas,  remember I am tight, Steve did point this out to me !
-  why boil off loads of water when you can more or less brew to volume ... again, Steve's wise words come to mind, why put cash into water vapour
- brewing to volume, bia batch sparging, means I am less likely to extract tannin from the grain
- my downstairs brewery doesn't need any more water vapour
- with modern malt, all of the work has already been done at the maltsters.  We basically just need to chuck it in the bath, give it a quick rinse and you are away
- A lot of us use hop pellets ... the rolling boil is just not necessary. 
- I don't consider the rolling boil to be necessary even with whole hops.  As home-brewers we can just chuck another ounce and be done with it.
- And for the protein considerations ... well Protofloc is just excellent at its job.

Thoughts there that reflect my mind-set and my brewery ... not a prescription of course


Multi-tasking, easy, drink beer and watch telly.
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Chris.B
Womble do you take it to the boil first then reduce to a simmer ?
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Womble
Chris.B wrote:
Womble do you take it to the boil first then reduce to a simmer ?


yep, following my reading of Clive la Pensée who said he had damp problems in his house.

initial boil to get beyond the hot break, add the hops and then lid on with a simmer. Works for me.


Multi-tasking, easy, drink beer and watch telly.
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EspeciallyBitter
Very interesting, Womble. I am conscious of how much water I use. Anything that involves using less overall volume to get the desired result is worth a try.
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Womble
EspeciallyBitter wrote:
Very interesting, Womble. I am conscious of how much water I use. Anything that involves using less overall volume to get the desired result is worth a try.


Texas, a dry state, I guess water is quite a consideration.  I use rain water for the actual brewing, the stuff that comes out of the tap is used for cleaning and I'm not sure how I can reduce that.  Don't shower on brew day is the only solution I have come up with so far.  And I'm not sure my wife is too happy about that !

Keeping the lid on means I use less bottled gas.  Even that is not so much of an issue as I probably only get through a couple of 13 kg bottles per year. 


Multi-tasking, easy, drink beer and watch telly.
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Chris.B
Womble wrote:


yep, following my reading of Clive la Pensée who said he had damp problems in his house.

initial boil to get beyond the hot break, add the hops and then lid on with a simmer. Works for me.





Cheers squire, well worth giving a go methinks.

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Womble
worth a go, yep

Multi-tasking, easy, drink beer and watch telly.
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