Margowicz
Hi all sorry for such a noobie question but I am new to this and I don't want to bodge these recipes and be put off before I have a go.

I was wondering if anyone can explain the numbers of the malts pictured below, what the difference between the malts are and perhaps even where I can buy some of the malts in the UK

Thanks in advance Gary  Screenshot_20200526-153308_Photos.jpg 
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Clibit
Hi Margowicz. It's a very reasonable question. The different crystal malts have been roasted to different degrees, resulting in a darker colour the longer they are roasted, and different flavours. Those malts are described in Lovibond, hence the capital L.  In the UK and Europe we use a different colour scale, EBC. These numbers are also used to describe beer colour. There is a colour converter here:

https://www.brewersfriend.com/color-calculator/

40L = 105 EBC
60L = 160 EBC
90L = 240 EBC

You will probably have to buy the closest thing. Some just sell them as pale, medium and dark crystal. 105 and 160 are both medium, 240 is dark. The places a lot of us buy from are:

themaltmiller.co.uk
geterbrewed.com
thehomebrewcompany.co.uk
brewuk.co.uk

There's a lot of crystal malt in that recipe.
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EspeciallyBitter
I've seen that recipe. It is a lot of crystal, about 17% of the grist. It's for a well-known US amber ale and I think I always assumed there would be some amber malt in there. I guess not!
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Margowicz
Clibit thank you for the reply, is there a guide i can follow for future reference ? I'll check that brewers friend guide. 

Especially bittier it is an alaskan beer 

Screenshot_20200526-172643.jpg 
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Robert

Richly malty is right. I would have expected disgustingly cloying but it must work or no-one would want to drink it.

@Margowicz, I don't know what you mean by "guide". There are explanations of Lovibond (L) and European Beer Colour (EBC) on Wikipedia if you want to read about them. There are loads of converters from one to the other,Clibit gave you a link to one.

You might have a problem sourcing exactly the crystal malt that recipe specifies, American maltsters tend to do things differently to UK maltsters, they have a range of crystal malts of different darkness, UK maltsters only have 3 or 4. You might have to use "light, medium, and dark crystal" but that won't make exactly that recipe. You might be in America of course, in which case disregard what I typed. Do you use any brewing software? That might help you get the right combination to get the right right colour at least, might be tedious to do, mind.

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GHW

Darker crystals / caramel malts  / caramalt (all much the same thing with different names) will add more burnt sugar / black treacle / fig/ raisin type notes

lower figures will add less distinct sweetness

medium will bring toffee

all will add body

That’s broadly speaking. Use darker more sparingly would be my suggestion. 

that recipe is an awful lot of crystal malt. I made a Sierra Nevada Pale ale clone with 10% and found it on the edge of what I’d personally want in a beer.

but the only way to know if it works for you is to do it!

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Clibit
Margowicz wrote:
Clibit thank you for the reply, is there a guide i can follow for future reference ? I'll check that brewers friend guide. 

 


Check this out...

http://mail.brupaks.com/BRUPAKS%20GRAIN%20GUIDE%20WEB.htm
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Margowicz
How would I convert the for example 1L = 2.5 EBC.

Never mind I just done the calculation, it's a ratio of 2.6666- 
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Margowicz
Robert wrote:
Do you use any brewing software?


Brewing software?  I did not know such a thing existed, any good ones for a android?

I did not know what EBC meant either but now I know what they mean
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Margowicz
GHW wrote:
that recipe is an awful lot of crystal malt.


To start with tha is for the info, and I was looking through several recipes, and noticed these number. I just needed the morning of these so I went and found one with several numbers so I could get a reasonable guide.
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Margowicz


Again thank you this is something which I was looking for.
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