Clibit
When I get the grains I need I'm going to brew something like this, a stout with an old style grain mix. A 'brown stout' I think. I would increase the IBUs, as the old stouts seemed to have high IBUs, and drop the late and dry hops. Probably.

https://byo.com/recipe/hook-norton-brewerys-double-stout-clone/

Double Stout clone
Hook Norton Brewery, UK

(5 gallons/19 L, all-grain)
OG = 1.051 FG = 1.013
IBU = 30 SRM = 43 ABV = 4.9%

The “double stout” in this beer’s name is not indicative of a strong beer. Actually, it’s quite low in gravity and makes a particularly good session pint. What the double means to me is that this beer literally has double the flavor of other low gravity stouts. East Kent Goldings hops lend a spicy character to the nose which blends in perfectly well with its rich, thick toasty body. The deep roast edges finish into a crisp dryness that ensures this beer’s utter drinkability. You better get this beer fast because it’s only seasonally available.

Ingredients
3.0 lb. (1.4 kg) mild malt
3.0 lb. (1.4 kg) English pale malt
2.0 lb. (0.91 kg) brown malt
1.0 lb. (0.45 kg) No. 1 invert sugar
13 oz. (0.37 kg) black malt

5.6 AAU Challenger hops (75 min.) (0.75 oz./21 g of 7.5% alpha hops)
0.25 oz. (7.1 g) Fuggle hops (15 min.)
0.25 oz. (7.1 g) East Kent Goldings hops (15 min.
0.25 oz. (7.1 g) East Kent Goldings hops (dry hopped)

Wyeast 1318 (London III) yeast (1 qt./1 L yeast starter)
3/4 cup corn sugar (if priming)

Step by Step
Mash at 156 °F (69 °C) for 120 minutes at a mash thickness of 1.15 qt./lb. Boil wort for 90 minutes, adding sugar for final 15 minutes of boil. Ferment at 68 °F (20 °C).

Partial mash option: Omit pale malt, reduce mild malt to 1 lb. 3 oz. (0.53 kg) and add 3 lb. 10 oz. (1.6 kg) Muntons Light liquid malt extract. Partial mash grains at 156 °F (69 °C) for 45 minutes. Collect partial mash wort, add water to make 3.0 gallons (11 L), and bring to a boil. Boil for 60 minutes, adding hops at times indicated in ingredient list. Stir in liquid malt extract for final 15 minutes of boil. Cool wort and transfer to fermenter. Top up to 5 gallons (10 ) with cool water and aerate wort. Pitch yeast and ferment at 68 °F (20 °C).

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AdrianDBW
Another one for my brew list!

It's grown significantly this weekend... Just when it had started to get shorter!
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Clibit
AdrianDBW wrote:
Another one for my brew list!

It's grown significantly this weekend... Just when it had started to get shorter!


Sorry!

I'm going to split a partial mash batch, half stout and half porter, 10 litres of each - mash some pale and brown malt for both brews, then steep other grains for each beer.

1. A stout, like this one, with amber and black malts. I've seen some 19th Century stouts with pale, brown, amber and black malts. Fancy it.
2. A porter, based on the Fullers London Porter and the Robochoc recipe I posted recently, with crystal and chocolate malts, and maybe a little roast barley.

Use DME to vary the ABV of the two brews.
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Robert
"The “double stout” in this beer’s name is not indicative of a strong beer."
Yes it is. 4.9% is very strong for beers of it's time. The original is good beer though and that recipe looks tasty.
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