Clibit
Something I have still never got round to doing but I really must. Has anyone ever roasted their own malt? In theory at least you could just buy pale malt and then make other malts yourself in your oven. I'm not advocating that!  But various forms of amber, brown and crystal malt are doable, and you can roast other grains too, like wheat and oats.  People say that toasted oats are great in beer.

Here are some links, similar info but a few differences....

http://www.howtobrew.com/book/section-4/experiment/toasting-your-own-malt

https://www.brewcabin.com/roasting-malts/

http://barleypopmaker.info/2009/12/08/home-roasting-your-malts/

Some ideas from the bottom link:
  • For Gold Malt (est. 20 L) that is malty, caramelly and rich but not toasty roast your base malt for 25 minutes at 300 degrees F.
  • For Amber Malt (est. 35 L) that is Nutty, Malty, and lightly toasty roast your base malt for 30 minutes at 350 degrees F.
  • For Copper Malt (est. 100 L)that has a strong toasted flavor with some nutlike notes roast your base malt for 30 minutes at 400 degrees F.
  • For Brown Malt (est. 175 L) that has a strong roasted flavor, roast your base malt for 50 minutes at 400 degrees F.
  • For Chocolate Malt (est 200+ L depending on time and heat): You need more heat and control than what you can get in the oven. For Chocolate malt use a clean stainless steel  or cast iron fry pan on low heat, slowly bringing medium-high heat. You need to stir or shake the pan constantly and not let any kernels sit still or you will end up with scorching instead of dry roasting.
  • For Crystal/Caramel Malt soak 1-2 lbs of pale 2 row in just enough water to cover plus about an inch (make sure you use distilled, filtered tap, or spring water). Let soak for a few hours, but no less than 2 hours and no more than 24, I soak for 3-4 hours. Then Put grains into a pan and keep grains about 2″ deep then place into a preheated 180 degree oven (make sure you have a probe thermometer in the oven and not to let the temps inside the stewing grain to go above 160. If they do reduce your ovens temperature) for 1 1/2 hours. Then spread out grain into 2 separate pans and make sure the grains are no more than 1″ deep. Then increase temperature in over to 250 and let bake for 2 hours or until dry. Then if desired remove from oven for light crystal, or use the roasting guide above to create your own darker versions of crystal malt.
  • You can also do what I call Sudo-Caramel malts. To do these you just wet the grain a bit to change the flavor and aroma profile and add a bit of sweetness to the grain. You will not get as much sweetness as if you do a full caramel malt process above, but you will make a great grain for both all grain and steeping grain for extract. Generally what you are going to do is soak the grain for under an hour, I find a half hour works well to impart a bit of wetness to the grain. You can use the same temperatures above to produce similar grains but add a touch of sweetness.


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Robert

If I did, I'd try to make diastatic brown malt and/or malt and roast bere/bigg/bygg.

Thread about diastic brown malt here:

https://www.homebrewinguk.com/post/diastatic-brown-malt-8513904?pid=1295739585

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justbeaz
Maybe something I'd look into you know me I do like to experiment.
I like my water with barley and hops
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Chug
I've posted this link before but checkout Francios Dyment's website on home malting, he's good at answering questions too.
https://brewingbeerthehardway.wordpress.com/
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Pesho77

 id be concerned with repeatability on this one, malt isn't that expensive so I cant see why any one would bother, other than to say they had done it.

 Pesh
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Clibit
Pesho77 wrote:

 id be concerned with repeatability on this one, malt isn't that expensive so I cant see why any one would bother, other than to say they had done it.

 Pesh


You can make malts that you can't buy. Unique flavours. People who do it often seem to rave about it. I hardly ever repeat brews anyway. 
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Robert

Chug wrote:
I've posted this link before but checkout Francios Dyment's website on home malting, he's good at answering questions too.
https://brewingbeerthehardway.wordpress.com/


Just had a look. The first thing I read reviews the following book. Now I'm hooked in and I'm seriously considering making brown malt

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