patwestlake
Is the difference between Hallertauer varieties enough to shop around for? I've brewed with H. tradition, but have access to Mittlefrueh or hersbrucker or blanc. It's going into a kolsch and the last one was superb so I'd like a similar profile.

Pat
FV : #81 Pixie Dust (Hobgoblin Gold)

Conditioning (bottles) : #80 Lightweight 2.7% Session NEIPA
Conditioning (bottles) : #63 Raspberry Sour (Melange Yeast + 1 year on Oak Chips)

Drinking : #79 Dodgy Tart (Blonde)
Drinking : #78 "Ghost Town" (Ghostship)
Drinking : #77 "Dragon Thief" (Cwtch)
Drinking : #76 "Lost Summer" (Cali Common)
Drinking : #75 "Suitably Distanced" (Sierra Nevada Pale Ale)
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Clibit
patwestlake wrote:
Is the difference between Hallertauer varieties enough to shop around for? I've brewed with H. tradition, but have access to Mittlefrueh or hersbrucker or blanc. It's going into a kolsch and the last one was superb so I'd like a similar profile. Pat



I've barely used German hops so not best placed to say, but I know that Blanc is a new hop with a very different profile. The others are not terribly different i think. 

Hallertau, Hallertauer and Hallertauer Mittelfrüher are all names for the original German Hallertau variety. Apparently.

"German hop Hersbrucker was originally bred with the intention of producing a variety resistant to verticillium wilt that could act as a replacement for Hallertau Mittelfrüh."

"Hallertau Tradition is a Hüll-bred fine aroma hop originating from Hallertau MittelfrüherHallertauer Gold and Saaz."
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Robbie
Hellertau Nothern Brewer was originally produced in the UK and then grown in Germany, its very good for a bitter addition in Lagers, but all of the German hops will be good in a Kolsch, whether its Hersbrucker, Tettnang, Mittlefruher or even Spalt Select, they tend to be quite subdued and herbal in quality.  Tettnang and Hersbrucker are like the Fuggles and EKG of German Lager, its just difficult to go wrong with them.
Beer is an expression of the human spirit. . . we use technical sciences as a tool to create it but its essence is and always will be a form of art - Handbook of brewing, chapter 2, page 55
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justbeaz
MSK wrote:
Hellertau Nothern Brewer was originally produced in the UK and then grown in Germany, its very good for a bitter addition in Lagers, but all of the German hops will be good in a Kolsch, whether its Hersbrucker, Tettnang, Mittlefruher or even Spalt Select, they tend to be quite subdued and herbal in quality.  Tettnang and Hersbrucker are like the Fuggles and EKG of German Lager, its just difficult to go wrong with them.


I used Hellertau in my last kolsch and it was lovley.
I like my water with barley and hops
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Robbie
justbeaz wrote:
I used Hellertau in my last kolsch and it was lovley.

Its fascinating, Hellertau is the region in Bavaria and is split up into I think thirteen? different areas all growing a specific kind of hop which is tested and certified for quality.  Mittlefruh was the original but its susceptible to disease so Hersbrucker was bred. I like Mittlefruh myself, i think  its more aromatic than Hersbrucker.  Its meant to be the biggest continuous area of growing hops in the world, imagine going there and just sucking in all that goodness. its gotta be healthy man!   But yeah Tradition is grown there, German Magnum, Northern Brewer and many other awesome hops.
Beer is an expression of the human spirit. . . we use technical sciences as a tool to create it but its essence is and always will be a form of art - Handbook of brewing, chapter 2, page 55
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Notlaw
Hallertau is just the region they come from, I think its the largest continuous area of hop growing in the world.  I have used Hersbrucker, Comet and Blanc a lot, and have also used Mittelfruh in a lager.  I love them, I've got a newfound appreciation for German hops, they don't get the credit due to them.
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