Clibit
What's yours?

I'm gonna go for boring old US05, cos it never lets me down, I like every beer I make with it. The CML Kolsch yeast made a very good beer for me though, that will be getting used more, for sure. 

But I'm really looking for inspiration. MJ Liberty Bell is going to get bought and tried soon. And MJ New World Strong. Seen good reviews of these two.

And I want to find out which lager yeast I like best - currently got S-23 in the FV. Will follow up eventually with WD/40 and S-189.


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Hops_and_Dreams
Clibit wrote:
What's yours?

I'm gonna go for boring old US05, cos it never lets me down, I like every beer I make with it. The CML Kolsch yeast made a very good beer for me though, that will be getting used more, for sure. 

But I'm really looking for inspiration. MJ Liberty Bell is going to get bought and tried soon. And MJ New World Strong. Seen good reviews of these two.

And I want to find out which lager yeast I like best - currently got S-23 in the FV. Will follow up eventually with WD/40 and S-189.



Agree, US05 is always reliable and cheap. Tried the MJ and Danstar equivalents, but always go back to the trusty 05.

Making a lager with WD40 sounds a bit experimental!
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Notlaw
US-05 is a nailed on for most people, I'd say.  For lagers, W34/70 is a great performer and gives better results than the other dried lager strains I've used (S23, S189 and MJ Bohemian Lager, although that was good too).  I've been impressed with BE256 and MJ Tripel for Belgian styles, and I still reckon S-04 is a solid performer... I've read tht some people use S-04 as a dried option in NEIPA styles.!
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Halfacrem
I knew WD40 had many uses, but...

I am embarrassingly deficient in my knowledge of Dry Yeast. I think I've only ever used US-05 and S-04. Had stuck fermentations twice with S-04 so tried liquid Yeast and haven't looked back. However, I am not organised enough to recapture and use my liquid Yeast, so I don't currently make the most of it. I should do a few comparisons with dry Yeast, so will be interested to hear of any opinions. Alas I can't add anything productive myself to this thread.
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Pinto
Notty and Gervin are solid workhorses which make good brews and cope well with high ABVs.  S04 I wasn't impressed with - stuck fermentation happened quite often and I found it lacked definition, kinda muddied. Windsor gave great English ale esters but floculated poorly and was also a pain to finish.  S-33 combined with Notty makes for a beast of a yeast in high grav brews like RIS.

MJs "Imperial" is a fruity animal ! BIG dry fruit and dates, not one for doing pale brews tho.

S-189 let down stinkingly last time, but can take the real high ABVs so the choice for big Doppelbocks as well as lagers. 34/70 is another good lager choice.

I'll be running several of the CmL yeasts soon so will report back.
Beer is like porn - you can buy it easily enough, but its so much more fun to make it [wink]
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Womble
For Running beers, Danstar ESB at the moment. But I prefer to use a proper ale strain from Wyeast.
Next on the list would be Windsor ... for running beers. 

Tend to use S23 for lager yeast, a bit more mellow & fruity.  Couldn't tell the difference between S189 & WD40  when I used them, a while ago, both give bright crisp dry results.

The only time I have ever had a non-starter of a fermentation was with S04 ... but I am pretty much convinced that that was the suppliers fault, poor storage and the like.  The same supplier delivered me some other poor performing yeasts ... so I stopped going there.


Multi-tasking, easy, drink beer and watch telly.
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Clibit
A long time brewer I respect on another forum says he uses M42 New World for most of his ales now. Thinks it's great. And another experienced brewer whose posts I like reading says he uses dried yeasts for all his English and American ales, except when he wants a distinctive English yeast flavour in a pale or blonde ale. I think this is where I am at too, probably, a lot of ales are great with the dry yeasts that suit you, but some beers benefit from a liquid or cultured strain, like a fruity English bitter, or a saison, or the Belgian styles. M31 seems popular though.
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BrewCat
Clibit wrote:
And another experienced brewer whose posts I like reading says he uses dried yeasts for all his English and American ales


Interesting thanks for posting that - do you happen to know which ones he's using?

I've also gone back to using dry yeast - latest batch a typical english bitter was with using SO4 - initially great but hop flavour soon disappeared (i'll post another thread on this)

Notty is a really fast yeast but doesn't bring much to the party flavour wise

Think I might try the M42 again.

I am looking for a good dry yeast strain for my english bitters that is fast, flocculates well and can add a little something taste-wise
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Clibit
BrewCat wrote:


Interesting thanks for posting that - do you happen to know which ones he's using?

I've also gone back to using dry yeast - latest batch a typical english bitter was with using SO4 - initially great but hop flavour soon disappeared (i'll post another thread on this)

Notty is a really fast yeast but doesn't bring much to the party flavour wise

Think I might try the M42 again.

I am looking for a good dry yeast strain for my english bitters that is fast, flocculates well and can add a little something taste-wise


I'm sorry I'm not sure which yeasts he favours without researching but I know he likes some of the MJ yeasts. I'm about to purchase M42 and M36. M36 seems to have a bit more flavour than M42, but M42 is apparently very fast and flocculent. I think M36 is quick and clears well but maybe not as quickly.

I need to try Muntons Gold too. Never knowingly have done. Unless its come with a kit. Saw this comment on the Homebrewers Association forum...

"My favorite dry yeast for English styles, hands down, is Munton's Gold. It's the closest dry yeast to Fuller's yeast that I have ever used." Blimey!

The Muntons basic yeast isn't bad at all, but finishes a big high. Which can be useful, in low ABV beers.
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