Pinto Show full post »
Robbie
It was a way for them to compensate for lack of modification in the past and no thermometers, the pulling, resting and boiling fully made up for it without them really understanding why, because you could do it based on calculations of volume alone.  This led to more consistency.  Whether it does impart a more robust flavour I cannot say as I have never done a decoction mash myself, but I would love to try it just once 😉 
Beer is an expression of the human spirit. . . we use technical sciences as a tool to create it but its essence is and always will be a form of art - Handbook of brewing, chapter 2, page 55
Quote 0 0
Tigermoth
Okay I'll let you try it first before trying it myself !! [thumb]
[wave]
Quote 0 0
Robert
I do decoction if I do step mashes but that's more to do with heating the mash up faster.
Quote 0 0
Robbie
It quite interesting i have a concealed element on my tun for doing step mashes because its a converted tea urn but I also have the ability to pump hot water from the HLT directly into the tun to raise temperature as in a step mash.  Has anyone used infusion as a method for increasing temp and doing step mashes?  I suspect that you would need to start off with a fairly thick mash and calculate the volumes required.
Beer is an expression of the human spirit. . . we use technical sciences as a tool to create it but its essence is and always will be a form of art - Handbook of brewing, chapter 2, page 55
Quote 0 0
Robert

Robbie wrote:
It quite interesting i have a concealed element on my tun for doing step mashes because its a converted tea urn but I also have the ability to pump hot water from the HLT directly into the tun to raise temperature as in a step mash.  Has anyone used infusion as a method for increasing temp and doing step mashes?  I suspect that you would need to start off with a fairly thick mash and calculate the volumes required.

Never done it but underletting with hot liquor to increase mash temperature used to be the method used in the UK. Yes, you'd start with a thick mash. Brewing software will do the volume/temp calculation for you. Brewtarget has a wizard for the purpose, change the temp or volume parameter and the other changes automagically.

I use a HERMS system so I take some water out of the HLT, boil in a kettle and add back to HLT at the same time as heating up some mash grain in a saucepan. Just to speed things up a bit (and give me something to do).

Quote 0 0
Robbie
Ok I was unaware. I think I will give it a try, start off with a slightly thick mash and add volume to increase temp.  Generally i do a fairly simple step mash 63C, 70C and then a mash out at 74C.  The appeal of piping in some hot water to raise temp is great rather than dialling it in on a temp controller.  Perhaps its more gentle as well and with less risk of scorching the enzymes.
Beer is an expression of the human spirit. . . we use technical sciences as a tool to create it but its essence is and always will be a form of art - Handbook of brewing, chapter 2, page 55
Quote 0 0
Robert
Robbie wrote:
Ok I was unaware. I think I will give it a try, start off with a slightly thick mash and add volume to increase temp.  Generally i do a fairly simple step mash 63C, 70C and then a mash out at 74C.  The appeal of piping in some hot water to raise temp is great rather than dialling it in on a temp controller.  Perhaps its more gentle as well and with less risk of scorching the enzymes.


The Hochkurz mash. I do that alot.
Quote 0 0
Robbie
yes 😉
Beer is an expression of the human spirit. . . we use technical sciences as a tool to create it but its essence is and always will be a form of art - Handbook of brewing, chapter 2, page 55
Quote 0 0
Tigermoth
I sort of did this merely by accident when I mashed in an insulated drink cooler, I started off with a thickish mash and then I added boiling water after a while to bring it up to 66C normal mash temp but at that stage I never did a mash out at 78C and it worked quite well. I then got my Robobrew and did the step mashes a bit more methodically and that has worked well for me.
[wave]
Quote 0 0
Robbie
I once hooked up a steamer (first a wallpaper steamer and then a steam gun) to my mash tun to see if I could use steam to raise the temp but they were too wussy and took ages.
Beer is an expression of the human spirit. . . we use technical sciences as a tool to create it but its essence is and always will be a form of art - Handbook of brewing, chapter 2, page 55
Quote 0 0
Tigermoth
What about circulating near boiling water through a wort chiller like a radiator but you would need a pump etc. but on second thoughts a lot of faffing about. actually a wallpaper steamer gets quite hot doesn't it, I have thought about using mine to kill weeds in the garden!!!!!! Nothing like a bit of ingenuity is there [rolleyes] 
[wave]
Quote 0 0