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PeterPi
Pesho77 wrote:

 I Cant see any photo, but if you haven't fined them yet ( cold crash to 2c then add finings) then they will be cloudy for a few days /  weeks thats normal 

 Pesh


Not used finings so far. I can see Wilko do some for a quid. Enough to treat 23 Litres. Any recommendations?
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Pesho77

 I would recommend gelatine, crash cool add about 1g / gallon then leave it for 1 day, then rack to a bottling bin then to bottle / keg

 Pesh
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Clibit
PeterPi wrote:


Not used finings so far. I can see Wilko do some for a quid. Enough to treat 23 Litres. Any recommendations?


The wilko ones are hopeless. Buy some gelatine from the supermarket.
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Steve
Clibit wrote:


The wilko ones are hopeless. Buy some gelatine from the supermarket.


😱 😂 converted are we 🤣?
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Clibit
Steve wrote:


😱 😂 converted are we 🤣?


No.
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Steve
Clibit wrote:


No.


[rofl]
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Robbie


Thanks for that.


I was really thinking about why the gravity was so high and wondering if it is possible to denature beta amylase, (the enzyme that is primarily used to produce yeasts favourite food maltose) by mashing too high. Depending on the temperature it seems that it degrades quite quickly.  Check this out, its from a German brewing publication.  It shows the half life of a beta amylase enzyme in comparison to temperature over time.  So basically if you mash at 75C it will only last for about 5 minutes before it runs out of activity, at 70C it will last for about 15 minutes before it denatures, at 65C it will last for about 40 min before its completely denatured and inactive. So depending on what temp you mashed at it is possible that this was the cause as you denatured the beta amylase and there was not enough time for it to covert the starches into fermentable sugars. i mean at least its theoretically possible I suppose.

Screenshot from 2018-07-25 20-49-38.png 

source : Brauwelt International


Beer is an expression of the human spirit. . . we use technical sciences as a tool to create it but its essence is and always will be a form of art - Handbook of brewing, chapter 2, page 55
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PeterPi
MSK wrote:


Thanks for that.


I was really thinking about why the gravity was so high and wondering if it is possible to denature beta amylase, (the enzyme that is primarily used to produce yeasts favourite food maltose) by mashing too high. Depending on the temperature it seems that it degrades quite quickly.  Check this out, its from a German brewing publication.  It shows the half life of a beta amylase enzyme in comparison to temperature over time.  So basically if you mash at 75C it will only last for about 5 minutes before it runs out of activity, at 70C it will last for about 15 minutes before it denatures, at 65C it will last for about 40 min before its completely denatured and inactive. So depending on what temp you mashed at it is possible that this was the cause as you denatured the beta amylase and there was not enough time for it to covert the starches into fermentable sugars. i mean at least its theoretically possible I suppose.

Screenshot from 2018-07-25 20-49-38.png 

source : Brauwelt International




I think that may be it.

I relied on a temperature gauge, in a previous brew which went south, in my boiler which I feel may be off. 

The last brew I made, the subject of this thread, did get too hot, by maybe, ten degrees. I'll try the finings and bottle it, because it tastes good, it's just cloudy. 

I didn't get around to making a ten litre brew this evening, but I'll get it done soon. My son helped me with the first brew I made, and that was bloody good. More attention to detail I think.

An axiom of mine is "If it was easy, everyone would be doing it". It would also be boring and we'd have nothing to chat about.
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