Alcoholx
https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-gloucestershire-39963098

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Clibit
Champagne is surely massively over priced? Lots of faff to remove the sediment though. I'm not a huge fan of these sparkly wines tbh. I used to quite like Frexeinet, a long time ago. I think. Be nice to have a known English version. Shampagne, maybe?!

No. Anglo Bubbly. Beat that! 😂
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EspeciallyBitter
Blighty Bubbly?
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John Barleycorn
Babycham - an ancient drink from ancient times...
otherwise known as perry
reputed to have been made from English pears, so history would have us believe.
sometimes mixed with brandy
hoptimism - the realisation that each pint carries you forward to an ever more perfect ale...
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Womble
I agree with Clibit on that one, Champagne is seriously over rated and expensive.

Babycham ... I did try a bottle once, a long time a go.

Fizz in bottles ... t'was probably discovered (invented ?) in several places at the same time. There had to be the glass technology before there could be fizz. 
Multi-tasking, easy, drink beer and watch telly.
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Alcoholx
another article along the same lines..  as womble said.. its all about the glass bottles

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/how-an-english-energy-crisis-helped-create-champagne?utm_source=pocket-newtab-global-en-GB
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Womble
Thanks A ... but I am a bit of a cheat really, living in France one picks up the odd bit of info here & there regarding wine and the making of.  And I had just re-read Figments of Reality by Ian Stewart & Jackie Cohen.  One of their theses is all about the recursive nature of evolution & inventions. Hence the need for glass before you can have fizz. When it's steam engine making time it's steam engine making time, to sort of quote the authors, most certainly imprecisely.  Not my idea unfortunately.  And BOY if EVER I had wanted to write a book, it would have been Figments of Reality.
Multi-tasking, easy, drink beer and watch telly.
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EspeciallyBitter
Pure speculation here, but did the easy availability of bottles able to withstand high pressure in that region of Europe encourage the growth of lambic brewing and the like? Presumably exploding bottles would discourage any conditioning with ‘infected’ beer. The complex, vinous character of 19th c. porter was obtained in huge vats rather than in sealed bottles.
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Womble
Lambic, no idea.  They age the stuff in barrels, so I guess glass isn't an absolute necessity.
Multi-tasking, easy, drink beer and watch telly.
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EspeciallyBitter
Womble wrote:
Lambic, no idea.  They age the stuff in barrels, so I guess glass isn't an absolute necessity.

Do wild fermentations ever really stop fermenting though? I feel like there's always something, slowly and silently chewing away at some carbohydrate...

Maybe sour beers are much better served highly carbonated?
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