Clibit
How much do you use dextrose in your recipes, if at all? And when do you use it?

I do put dextrose in beers, sometimes just to lift the OG a bit! But more often I use it to counteract a high OG or a low attenuating yeast, so that the beer doesn't end too sweet. Or of I am using liquid malt extract, I find some dextrose helps to balance the beer out a bit, it improves the fermentability.

I don't tend to go above about 10% though. I would never go over about 20%, I reckon. 
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Simonh82
I've never used it and I doubt that I will if I'm honest.  The one vaguely Belgian beer I made, I used a tin of golden syrup but I am happy with all grain for my English/American styles.

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Clibit
Simonh82 wrote:
I've never used it and I doubt that I will if I'm honest.  The one vaguely Belgian beer I made, I used a tin of golden syrup but I am happy with all grain for my English/American styles.



Understood. But what about strong ales? And high ABV Belgians? Only syrup? 
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Northern Brewster
I’ve used it to bump up the OG of a barley wine along with honey but only in a relatively small quantity.
I don’t have hobbies. I’m developing a robust post-apocalyptic skill set.
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Clibit
This is interesting:

http://www.port66.co.uk/experimenting-fermenting-sugars/

The port66 blogger is actually James Kemp, who has a fine brewing CV - he is now at Yeastie Boys, after stints at Fullers, Thornbrudge, Buxton and Marble. I was also told recently that he designed the Youngs kits and the Festival kits.

The article is about an experiment he did compare a lager kit brew with three different sugars - dextrose, sucrose and DME. Each kit had 1kg of sugar added to the extract from the kit.

The dextrose scored nearly as highly as the DME, the sucrose was well behind.

Here are the results:

Results
 

Dextrose

(average score)

Sucrose

(average score)

DME

(average score)

Body8.5/107/108.7/10
Flavour8.2/106.5/108.8/10
Aroma8.5/106.9/108.8/10
Overall8.4/106.8/108.8/10

What's interesting I think is that the dextrose version scored nearly as highly for body as the DME version. The fact it was a lager may help account for that?

What's also interesting is the dextrose version was perceived to be very different and much better than the sucrose version. 

It suggests that a mix of dextrose and DME might work very well. Shame he didn't do one with a kilo of brew enhancer.




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Pinto
I've used dextrose before, but not for a long, long time - I always keep a kg on hand tho.  IMO, Dextrose is a direct convert into abv, as it's fully and easily digestible by yeast; as you say clib, if you need more alcololly or to dry out a brew it's the tool for the job.  Using sucrose could be argued is no different, given the yeast just produces invertase and breaks it into fructose and glucose anyway; but in the case of say, Belgians, I think that's actually important - yes its broken down to the same ultimately, but there are a myriad of biotransformations and compounds produced by that hard working little sacch that wouldn't if you gave it easy food.  These are the things we try so hard to encourage in our (especially belgian) beers....

Horses for courses, in't end 😉
Beer is like porn - you can buy it easily enough, but its so much more fun to make it [wink]
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Clibit
We know that macro lagers generally contain a high proportion of corn or rice syrup. I think I'd you want that light body to a lager, or even an ale perhaps, there is no shame in using dextrose to achieve that aim. It can help to improve drinkability, I think. There's no right and wrong, it's down to personal taste. 
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GHW
What’s in brew enhancer? Is that not a mix of dme and dextrose?
Dextrose is brewing sugar which I use to bottle condition, so surely that’s been selected as ‘brewing’ sugar (over sucrose etc) for its favourable properties in brewing?
That said you wouldn’t expect it to come near dme when replacing that large a percentage
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Pinto
Brew enhancer is usually a 50:50 cut with spray malt and dextrose.  Dextrose is chosen for the fact it's 100% fermentable by the yeast hence the prefered "brewing" sugar title.
Beer is like porn - you can buy it easily enough, but its so much more fun to make it [wink]
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Hops_and_Dreams
I've used around 5% to dry out US IPAs before. Not really used it other than that.
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Robbie
Clibit wrote:
We know that macro lagers generally contain a high proportion of corn or rice syrup. I think I'd you want that light body to a lager, or even an ale perhaps, there is no shame in using dextrose to achieve that aim. It can help to improve drinkability, I think. There's no right and wrong, it's down to personal taste. 


Yes I added 280g to my latest version of my house Pale ale and it took the gravity from around 1050 right down to 1011-1012 exactly what I was looking for.  Previously I had been getting 1015-1016 which was fine also but I wanted something just slightly drier, Dextrose did it wonderfully!
Beer is an expression of the human spirit. . . we use technical sciences as a tool to create it but its essence is and always will be a form of art - Handbook of brewing, chapter 2, page 55
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