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Clibit

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Interesting one for getting some info on these two yeasts. I've used Belle Saison a few times, but not Safbrew Abbaye. Anybody used it?

http://brulosophy.com/2015/08/10/yeast-comparison-danstar-belle-saison-vs-safbrew-abbaye-exbeeriment-results/

Fermented at 66F for 5 days, then 74F. The beer was a saison of sorts, hopped with a load of IPA hops. Strange choice perhaps. Looks like the Abbaye yeast is one to try, though the writer much preferred the Belle Saison beer despite most of the tasters preferring the Abbaye beer.

"My Impressions: There wasn’t a point where I ever experienced these beers as not being obviously different from each other. I was accurate in multiple quasi-blind triangle tests. In fact, at one point, a couple guys attempted to test my confidence by secretly serving me 3 samples of the same beer (Abbaye), it caught me off-guard, but I eventually realized their ploy and called them out. The Belle Saison beer, to me, had a much more identifiable Saison character with a stronger hop aroma, while the Abbaye beer had noticeably less phenols, muted hop aroma, and was balanced more toward a bready malt character. Sure, I was biased by my awareness of the nature of the difference, but this is the first time in awhile I feel fairly certain I’d be able to tell these beers apart as a fully blind participant. Just typing that felt arrogant…

"As for the beers, I thought they were pretty damn good. I was a bit surprised to discover most people preferred the Abbaye beer, as I rather strongly preferred the batch fermented with Belle Saison. Either way, I’m stoked to use Fermentis Abbaye in a more traditional Belgian style soon, probably a Tripel I’ve got to make for a competition, as it seems to have some fantastic qualities for a super easy-to-use dry yeast. I also look forward to playing around with Belle Saison in more than just cider, I’m particularly interested to ferment it at more common Saison temps in an attempt to coax more character out of it.
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Pinto

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Used the Fermentis Abbaye in my "Friar Tuck" English malt Dubbel a while back - found it to be an unremarkable belgian ale yeast, some phenols, muted esters and yes, it did quite a good job of emphasising the malt body, but that was the effect I was after TBH.

Fermented @ 23 degrees IIRC

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Clibit

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pinto
Used the Fermentis Abbaye in my "Friar Tuck" English malt Dubbel a while back - found it to be an unremarkable belgian ale yeast, some phenols, muted esters and yes, it did quite a good job of emphasising the malt body, but that was the effect I was after TBH.

Fermented @ 23 degrees IIRC


The reviewer above much preferred the Belle Saison beer. 
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Pinto

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Cant comment as I've never used Belle Saison.  Just know that the Abbaye does what it says on the pack [wink]
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Clibit

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pinto
Cant comment as I've never used Belle Saison.  Just know that the Abbaye does what it says on the pack [wink]


I've used Belle Saison 2 or 3 times. Mate uses it quite a lot. It can throw a lot of spice. But varies a bit in how much. Temperature presumably. Cell count, perhaps. It can make a very nice beer, but I prefer other saison yeasts, liquid ones, that I've sampled in beers.
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