Clibit
Quite a detailed article about the effect of WW1 on the brewing industry, in Belgium mainly. A few extracts below.

http://allaboutbeer.com/article/beer-in-the-shadow-of-war/

"The Germans also designated which breweries (the most modern) were allowed to continue production to supply their troops. “Due to the wells and water heating equipment, the Germans converted other breweries into cavalry quarters, baths, laundries, dewatering stations and slaughterhouses.” The rest were pillaged for materials that were shipped to German arms production plants."

"Many brewers had their equipment ransacked by the occupiers, especially those who heeded the call from the Belgian government not to brew for the Germans. Paul Verhaeghe, then owner of Brouwerij Verhaeghe, maker of Duchesse de Bourgogne, was one of those brewers. In response, the Germans dismantled his brewery."

“The English were especially big beer drinkers,” says Dubois. “Their presence created a strong demand that the brewers had trouble satisfying."

"World War I devastated the brewing industry in Belgium and France. Of the 2,419 breweries in northern France before the war, only 1,371 remained in business by the mid-1920s, according to an article by Dubois. In Belgium, 2,109 of the pre-war 3,214 breweries were still open, as noted in Jef Van den Steen’s book, Trappist: The Seven Magnificent Beers."

"In the shadow of 40 million casualties, beer seems a small and trivial thing. Yet for those in occupied areas or on the front lines, it was a welcome luxury and a reminder of better times."

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Tony1951
Thinking back to those times and comparing the trials of life, my generation escaped very lightly. My grandfather was shot on the Somme right through the chest and although he was left for days in the mud, he did not die. I can only think that he was hit by a bullet that was almost spent of its energy, because at anything like its effective range, machine gun and rifle bullets will not only penetrate and pass right through (as his did) but if they are at full speed they will destroy a large amount of tissue around the wound.  Anyway - miraculously he survived but was an invalid for about a decade during which he fathered two children, one of them my mother born in 1921. Of course, her generation also went to war and with the same people! As a child in the 1950s, I spotted the pattern during family discussions about the wars and I remember wondering when I would have to go to war with the Germans! I can remember worrying about it aged about seven.
I am off grid until the weekend.
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Clibit
Tony1951 wrote:
Thinking back to those times and comparing the trials of life, my generation escaped very lightly. My grandfather was shot on the Somme right through the chest and although he was left for days in the mud, he did not die. I can only think that he was hit by a bullet that was almost spent of its energy, because at anything like its effective range, machine gun and rifle bullets will not only penetrate and pass right through (as his did) but if they are at full speed they will destroy a large amount of tissue around the wound.  Anyway - miraculously he survived but was an invalid for about a decade during which he fathered two children, one of them my mother born in 1921. Of course, her generation also went to war and with the same people! As a child in the 1950s, I spotted the pattern during family discussions about the wars and I remember wondering when I would have to go to war with the Germans! I can remember worrying about it aged about seven.


Amazing story Tony. You nearly didn't exist! My mum was born 1929. We have been incredibly lucky, born at the right time. 
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Tony1951
Clibit wrote:


Amazing story Tony. You nearly didn't exist! My mum was born 1929. We have been incredibly lucky, born at the right time. 


Never a truer word Phil.
I am off grid until the weekend.
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