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Clibit
GHW wrote:
My roggenbier was a bit like that, muddy and weird (and red). Maybe the rye wasn’t the best option for the fruit sour?


Possibly yeah, but I think it's the fruit that's not right.
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Pesho77
GHW wrote:
My roggenbier was a bit like that, muddy and weird (and red). Maybe the rye wasn’t the best option for the fruit sour?


 Spicy rye should work well with fruit, if you can get the quantities right

 Pesh
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Pesho77
Its a shame this one didn't turn out it sounded good too, id say for next time do the souring with lacto, for 3 days @40c if you can then go from there.

 Pesh
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Clibit
Pesho77 wrote:
Its a shame this one didn't turn out it sounded good too, id say for next time do the souring with lacto, for 3 days @40c if you can then go from there.

 Pesh


Yes I made this beer on the spur of the moment after picking up a box of ripe apricots at work, it was all a bit rushed, using what I had etc. Made some mistakes I think. I've learnt from it at least.
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John Barleycorn
I don't know what I'm talking about so please feel free to ignore this.
Apricots contain anthocyanins, in both flesh and skin, which can impart a red colour to anything they are dissolved in. 
The colour yellow->orange->red can be affected by, among other things the strength of solution and the pH of that solute.
Is this where your colour has appeared from?
I've seen a redness in the flesh around the pit in a peach on occasions. Maybe that is similar.

Appearance goes a long way to affecting whether something strikes us as 'good' or 'appetizing'.

Incidentally anthrocyanins are reputed to have positve pharmacological attributes. Among other properties they are classed as anti-oxidants.

Perhaps you could distribute this brew as Clibit's Patent Miraculous Cure-All and gain fame and notoriety.
hoptimism - the realisation that each pint carries you forward to an ever more perfect ale...
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Clibit
John Barleycorn wrote:
I don't know what I'm talking about so please feel free to ignore this.
Apricots contain anthocyanins, in both flesh and skin, which can impart a red colour to anything they are dissolved in. 
The colour yellow->orange->red can be affected by, among other things the strength of solution and the pH of that solute.
Is this where your colour has appeared from?
I've seen a redness in the flesh around the pit in a peach on occasions. Maybe that is similar.
Appearance goes a long way to affecting whether something strikes us as 'good' or 'appetizing'

Incidentally anthrocyanins are reputed to have positve pharmacological attributes. Among other properties they are classed as anti-oxidants.


That's interesting John, thanks, it may well help explain the colour.

It's the flavour I'm not digging though. There's a strange flavour in there, it's from the apricots I am sure but it's a bit like burnt apricot if you can imagine that. Not nice anyway! I'm going to see if it dissipates, but I am not going to hang any hopes on it. 
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John Barleycorn
Apricot can have an earthy, bitter flavour. Your pre-brew manipulations might have produced the red colour and altered the fruit taste?
hoptimism - the realisation that each pint carries you forward to an ever more perfect ale...
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Steve
May be apricots just don’t like rye 😂
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Clibit
John Barleycorn wrote:
Apricot can have an earthy, bitter flavour. Your pre-brew manipulations might have produced the red colour and altered the fruit taste?


Yes possibly. I was a right faff too. I'm not moved to make fruit beers again tbh. I did a rhubarb saison once, it turned out well but that was a big faff too, and I have had lots of really nice saisons that didn't use fruit and I pretty much now feel there's plenty of scope without preparing fruit and straining it etc. Simpler ways to get fruit flavours into a beer too, if you want them.  But I can cope without tbh! Lots of flavours available from malts, hops and yeasts, and simple additions like orange/lemon peel, vanilla etc.

Maybe the answer is to get a juicer and just add juice.
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