Clibit Show full post »
Clibit
Halfacrem wrote:
Having decided my airing cupboard was too risky a place to hide a bottle of starter, I risked using the brew fridge. I was a bit concerned that if I set the temp too high, the heater would blow up! I've set the Inkbird to 30C and wrapped a load of insulating material around the starter. 4 hours later and the temp on the outside of the starter bottle is 30C [thumb]


Cool.  I mean warm!  I can't wait to do mine, more excited about it than anything I've brewed for a while. New venture. I should just stick a small batch on quick shouldn't I?
Quote 1 0
Halfacrem
A check on the brew fridge and the temp is down to 24C, so clearly, I need to insulate my starter bottle a bit better next time. I reckon it's still had a decent enough kick off to make something in the way of a sour starter. 

I'm going to keep the fridge going up until midday, then transfer off the grain to another bottle and keep in the fridge until I can brew (probably Thursday). Reckon I need to boil the starter again, or just keep in the fridge until Thursday?

EDIT: No, boiling would be silly as it would kill off the bacteria that will make the main wort sour! Silly me. Too much beer last night [wink]
Quote 0 0
Halfacrem
Just had a nibble on an acid malt grain! Blimey you can taste the sourness straight away..quite moreish actually [smile]
Quote 1 0
Clibit
Halfacrem wrote:
Just had a nibble on an acid malt grain! Blimey you can taste the sourness straight away..quite moreish actually [smile]


You could make a sour Berliner weisse beer just by using about 8% acid malt. In a normal mashing process. Not sure how good it would be, but it is a way to add a bit of sourness. Something I'd like to play with. Here is a recipe for an apricot sour beer that just uses lactic acid to create the sourness, and apricot puree to round it out and add some flavour.

https://beerandbrewing.com/easy-way-apricot-sour-recipe/
Quote 0 0
Halfacrem
Clibit wrote:


You could make a sour Berliner weisse beer just by using about 8% acid malt. In a normal mashing process. Not sure how good it would be, but it is a way to add a bit of sourness. Something I'd like to play with. Here is a recipe for an apricot sour beer that just uses lactic acid to create the sourness, and apricot puree to round it out and add some flavour.

https://beerandbrewing.com/easy-way-apricot-sour-recipe/


I'm going to cover all basis. Sour starter with whole grains and a bit of lactic acid. Some Acid malt in the Mash, plus some Lactic acid in the Mash. Might add some paint stripper just to finish it off..
Quote 0 0
Clibit
Halfacrem wrote:


I'm going to cover all basis. Sour starter with whole grains and a bit of lactic acid. Some Acid malt in the Mash, plus some Lactic acid in the Mash. Might add some paint stripper just to finish it off..


All in the one beer?! 

Quote 0 0
Halfacrem
Clibit wrote:


All in the one beer?! 



Yes.....OK, maybe not the Paint stripper [smile] 

Based on other recipes that have used a bit of acid malt in the mash as well as having a sour starter. Dependent on how acidic the starter is I might add a little lactic acid to the mash also. 

I've decided to leave the starter for another day in the brew fridge. If I can keep it at 24C, so be it. By all accounts something will happen. If tomorrow the starter smells sour, I'll decant off the grains. If it smells like Oliver Reeds vest after a night out...back to square one.
Quote 0 0
Clibit
Halfacrem wrote:


Yes.....OK, maybe not the Paint stripper [smile] 

Based on other recipes that have used a bit of acid malt in the mash as well as having a sour starter. Dependent on how acidic the starter is I might add a little lactic acid to the mash also. 

I've decided to leave the starter for another day in the brew fridge. If I can keep it at 24C, so be it. By all accounts something will happen. If tomorrow the starter smells sour, I'll decant off the grains. If it smells like Oliver Reeds vest after a night out...back to square one.


I suspect you could add lactic acid before bottling, have a taste and add drops if you want a bit more sourness?
Quote 0 0
Halfacrem
Ever subject to a change of mind (indecisive, me?) I decanted the starter wort off the grain into a fresh sanitised bottle, to store for a couple of days. Had a cheeky taste of the remainder and I'm pleased to say, it's sour. Not pucker the lips sour, but nicely sour [smile] Really pleased (so far) that you can get a sour taste and not have to necessarily follow strict criteria. Too early to tell, but my suspicion that Sour beer is shrouded in the same myth and legend as sourdough bread, is intact (a stance I will staunchly hold until I'm proved otherwise)

I'm storing the starter in the fridge until I can brew (Thursday).  
Quote 1 0
Clibit
Halfacrem wrote:
Ever subject to a change of mind (indecisive, me?) I decanted the starter wort off the grain into a fresh sanitised bottle, to store for a couple of days. Had a cheeky taste of the remainder and I'm pleased to say, it's sour. Not pucker the lips sour, but nicely sour [smile] Really pleased (so far) that you can get a sour taste and not have to necessarily follow strict criteria. Too early to tell, but my suspicion that Sour beer is shrouded in the same myth and legend as sourdough bread, is intact (a stance I will staunchly hold until I'm proved otherwise)

I'm storing the starter in the fridge until I can brew (Thursday).  


The (new) Marble brewer tonight told me not to bother with proper souring and to just use acid malt. And to use 40% acid malt in a Berliner Weisse. Which is way more than I've seen suggested. Weyermann recommend 8% for a Berliner. He suggested our fruit salad Berliner Weisse will contain 30% wheat, 40% acid malt, and I didn't hear the next bit cos I was shocked!

We are doing a BW brew anyway, so I will see what we do and report back! This fella has worked at Magic Rock and Buxton before, two top breweries, and created award winning sour beers, so he knows what he is doing.
Quote 0 0
Halfacrem
Clibit wrote:


The (new) Marble brewer tonight told me not to bother with proper souring and to just use acid malt. And to use 40% acid malt in a Berliner Weisse. Which is way more than I've seen suggested. Weyermann recommend 8% for a Berliner. He suggested our fruit salad Berliner Weisse will contain 30% wheat, 40% acid malt, and I didn't hear the next bit cos I was shocked!

We are doing a BW brew anyway, so I will see what we do and report back! This fella has worked at Magic Rock and Buxton before, two top breweries, and created award winning sour beers, so he knows what he is doing.


Now, that is interesting and backs up the myth and legend conspiracy even further [smile] I was very surprised just how sour the acid Malt tasted, so I can imagine a big dose would have a large impact on a Mash.


 
Quote 0 0
Halfacrem
A very quick dive into the subject over a cup of tea brings up this thread. Some response that Acid Malt on its own might be a bit one dimensional. But if your Brewer friend is prepared to go with it.I'll be interested to hear the results.

https://aussiehomebrewer.com/threads/sour-beer-using-just-acidulated-malt.91979/
Quote 0 0
Clibit
Halfacrem wrote:
A very quick dive into the subject over a cup of tea brings up this thread. Some response that Acid Malt on its own might be a bit one dimensional. But if your Brewer friend is prepared to go with it.I'll be interested to hear the results.

https://aussiehomebrewer.com/threads/sour-beer-using-just-acidulated-malt.91979/


He's not a brewer friend he's the head brewer at the Marble brewery. I did say I'd read that you get more complexity from a proper souring process. And he didn't disagree, saying complexity depends on the lacto strains you use and not just using a single strain. He said Longley Farm yoghurt works well. He is making occasional sour beers on a commercial scale so simplicity is presumably the desired approach. The Chorlton brewery here in Manchester specialises in sours and uses souring bacteria of course. Marble has always been strong in American pales and IPAs. They only use American and NZ hops. 95% American. He's a young New head brewer just back from a trip to America and was talking about the amazing new beers over there with low bitterness and loads of flavour and mouth feel and he wants to push the brewery in that direction!
Quote 1 0