Clibit
Useful info for those who like German wheat beers and don't have much experience of brewing them...


https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/how-to-brew/7-tips-brewing-german-wheat-beers/


1) Pick the Right Yeast for the Job

Select your yeast strain carefully to develop the flavor profile you desire. Different stains produce varying amounts of the esters and flavor compounds associated with German-style wheat beers. Choose a strain that emphasizes the characteristics you desire.

If you plan to harvest and repitch yeast, know and expect that many of the popular strains are very labile: That is, the flavor profile will wander within one or two batches of beer, and the yeast will very quickly lose viability, sometimes after just one repitch. Top cropping and immediate repitching are the only solutions to this problem.

2) Explore the Varieties of Wheat

Consider the type of wheat you would like to use in your brew. Do you want the full, grainy taste of a hard winter red wheat or the light delicate flavor of a white summer variety? Research your options.

7 Tips on Brewing German Wheat Beers

3) Aim For Refined Hop Character

Keep hops bitterness and flavor low so that wheat and yeast character can shine. Variety matters! Select a noble variety with spicy, herbal flavors that will balance and blend with flavors generated by your yeast. Shoot for 10-15 BUs, early in the kettle, with very low aroma.

4) Know Your Water

Traditional German-style wheat beers are brewed with a wide range of water profiles that vary from soft to moderately hard. The goal would be to make sure your mash is in the optimum pH range: 5.2 to 5.6. If mineral additions are necessary, use chloride to enhance the beer’s texture rather than sulfate, which will enhance bitterness.

5) Make a Mash Plan

Mashing can be as simple as a single-step infusion mash, or you might include a ferulic acid rest (to enhance development of 4-vinyl-guaiacol, which produces clove like flavors) at 105–112°F (40–44°C) and/or a protein rest at 120-128°F (49–53°C) before saccharification. Keep saccharification temperatures low if you want the light body typical of the style. Raising the temperature during mash out will help to avoid a “stuck mash.”

6) Avoid a “Stuck Mash”

Wheat beer mashes have a reputation for being a little ornery when it comes time to run off because wheat malt lacks husks. If you mill your own grain, adjust the mill to grind your wheat malt more coarsely than the barley malt. Try to minimize the amount of flour out of the mill, and make wheat malt the last addition to the mash tun so that malts with husks rest on the false bottom or lautering screen. Mix the remainder of the barley and wheat malts thoroughly to avoid stratification.

Rice hulls added to the mash can help maintain porosity; try a pound (0.45 kg) in the mash for a 5-gallon (19 liter) batch.

7) Fermentation Temperature

Even with the same yeast strain, slight variations in fermentation temperature can produce profoundly different results. Find the sweet spot where the yeast generates the flavors you desire in your finished beer, dial in the temperature, and keep fermentation in a narrow temperature range. Consider pitching at a temperature below your intended control temperature (For example, pitch at 65°F/18°C for a 68°F/20°C fermentation).

Be sure to allow fermentation to finish completely, as weizen yeasts are prone to diacetyl production in underattenuated beer. Don’t chill your beer too soon at the end of fermentation, and consider allowing the temperature to rise for a day or so after fermentation is complete just to be safe.

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GHW
Good advice here though perhaps hard to act on some of it. Mashing is the biggest challenge, my dunkelweizen was somewhat spoiled (still nice but could have been better) by being under gravity. I'd suggest rice bulls and a few stirs of the mash to keep it free. Yeast selection fairly obviously important but I'd add to the above; this is one instance where there really is no substitute for good quality fresh liquid yeast. Using the mangrove jack Bavarian was a mistake; people have claimed good results with it but I thought it was a very poor cousin to wyeast wiestephaner.
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Clibit
GHW wrote:
Good advice here though perhaps hard to act on some of it. Mashing is the biggest challenge, my dunkelweizen was somewhat spoiled (still nice but could have been better) by being under gravity. I'd suggest rice bulls and a few stirs of the mash to keep it free. Yeast selection fairly obviously important but I'd add to the above; this is one instance where there really is no substitute for good quality fresh liquid yeast. Using the mangrove jack Bavarian was a mistake; people have claimed good results with it but I thought it was a very poor cousin to wyeast wiestephaner.


A liquid yeast is definitely a good move. It's also a good beer style for culturing yeast from a commercial bottle, as there should be plenty of yeast, although many wheat beers are apparently bottle conditioned with lager yeasts. Schneider Weisse uses the primary yeast though, by all accounts. It's a simple job to grow enough yeast from bottles, and well worth the effort.
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GHW
I've also heard that many don't use the primary strain for bottle conditioning. I've already got some wiestephaner on order for a roggenbier, so no culturing for me this time!
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HisDudeness
I am one of the Mangrove Jacks endorsers and it did produce a couple of very decent beers for me but I would like to give a liquid strain a try so next time will get one on order. Mashing not just for wheat beers but across the board has been problem free for me since I started using a BIAB grain bag to line my mash tuns, this on top of the usual manifold/filter gives me rapid draining and no stuck mashes/sparges even when the grain bed appears to have set like concrete as you often see with the finer particles from wheat based beers. It also makes clean up a doddle as I can lift out all the grain in the bag to chuck to chickens/compost and then the tun itself just needs a quick rinse and its sorted. So definitely worth a try if wheat beers or any style cause you issues in the mash
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GHW
many people advocated the MJ yeast, that's why I gave it a go (as well as the convenience). maybe it was just a profile i didn't particularly like, but it didn't kick out anywhere near the amount of classic weiss flavours I was after. 
funny thing was I didn't have issues mashing when doing wheat biab - I think the recirculation on the grainfather was the issue - constant downward force on the mash bed probably compacted it more than it could cope and my efficiency was way down. I stirred the wit I did (that got infected) and got spot on gravity. it's a bit of a bugger lifting the top plate off the GF when it's running though! you have to stick your fingers in 67c wort!

one area where the GF is definitely at a disadvantage.

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