Clibit
I'm pretty sure we have covered this before - the six provisional 'new' beer styles in the BJCP guidelines. Pinch of salt maybe, bit like the world baseball series! But they are all pretty well established and distinctive styles, from different parts of the world, at least. Not sure how Burton Ale is new though.

http://www.beersyndicate.com/blog/six-new-beer-styles-2018/

I think I've drunk examples of all six now. Bit I don't think I've brewed any of them, though I did do a New Zealand lager - whether it was a pilsner or not, is doubtful. I'm interested in brewing a Mexican lager - mainly cos of the Mexican yeast. How different is that? And maybe a Catherina Sour will get brewed next year.

1. New England IPA: Generally an American IPA but with intense fruit flavor and aroma, soft body, smooth mouthfeel, often opaque, hazy, less perceived bitterness, always hop-forward, “juicy”, malt in background, with a soft finish and no sulfate bite.

2GrisetteEssentially a session version of a saison ale with wheat. Originating in Belgium as a style associated with coal miners (not farm workers), a Grisette exhibits a saison-like aroma (spicy, phenolic, fruit/citrusy), high carbonation, big white head, and is often dry-hopped.

3. New Zealand Pilsner: This style can be brewed as either an ale or lager and is similar to a German Pils, but is not as crisp and sharp in the finish, has a softer, maltier balance with slightly more body. NZ Pils utilizes New Zealand hop varieties (Motueka, Riwaka, Nelson Sauvin, etc.) which commonly exhibit notes of tropical fruit, melon, lime, gooseberry, grass, and citrus. 

4. Burton Ale:  Popular in Burton, England before IPAs were invented, and widely exported to the Baltic countries, Burton ales are dark, rich, malty, sweet, and bitter with moderately strong alcohol. Full bodied and chewy with a balanced hoppy finish and a complex malty and hoppy aroma. Dark dried fruit notes accentuate the malty richness, while the hops help balance the sweeter finish.

5. Mexican Lager
: A dry refreshing lager that usually incorporates corn, noble-type hops, and always uses Mexican yeast. The range of the style is wide in terms of bitterness, hops, and malt flavor, but is modeled around craft versions (Ska’s Mexican Logger, etc.), not mass-produced industrial examples.

6. Catharina Sour: A local Brazilian style, this light and sour fruit beer exhibits clean lactic sourness (not funk or acetic vinegar notes), strong and immediately noticeable fresh fruit character (often tropical), low bitterness, light body, high carbonation and incorporates wheat at roughly equal proportions to barley. With an ABV of 4-5.5%, Catharina sour is like a stronger version of a Berliner Weisse (not as sour as a lambic or gueuze), refreshing, and typically kettle soured, followed by a clean ale yeast fermentation.

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Pesho77

 The "world series" came from the world news paper that sponsored the series, its not a world wide event.

 Pesh
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Clibit
Pesho77 wrote:

 The "world series" came from the world news paper that sponsored the series, its not a world wide event.

 Pesh


Well I never knew that.
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